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Album Reviews
Friday, April 4, 2014
  Machine Mass covers a lot of ground within the context of what’s still often called, for lack of a more familiar term, “avant-garde jazz.” Some tracks sparkle with East Indian influences, others wax funky or deliver an almost rock band drive. The trio features Dave Liebman (saxophone), Tony Bianco
Home Movies/Out on Digital
Thursday, April 3, 2014
“Monsters” ran for three seasons (1988-1991) but like the vampires that were its occasional guest spots, it enjoyed an afterlife—on syndication and the Sci-Fi Channel. All 72 episodes are included on a DVD set. Half-hour long in the tradition of “Twilight Zone,” they tell compact stories of
Film
Monday, March 31, 2014

Latin American Film Series opens with Marcelo Machado’s documentary

In 1964, Brazil’s military overthrew their country’s government and The Beatles’ music
Film
Monday, March 31, 2014

An Indian story of food, longing and loneliness

  Ila, a young Mumbai housewife, tries to stimulate the unresponsive appetites of her husband by cooking a splendid set of dishes and sending them by bicycle courier to his office for lunch. When the courier delivers her delicious meal
Books
Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Two books on buildings and design

  Although our lives would be poorer for it, we could live without paintings, music or theater. But we can’t survive without buildings. Architecture and the design of the places we inhabit exert a continual influence on our wellbeing as well as being essential to our existence. A pair of fascinating
Home Movies/Out on Digital
Monday, March 24, 2014
 Nominated for Best Foreign Language Film, this Belgian movie deals with familiar subjects: the idyll of love, the unexpected arrival of a child, the death of that little girl from cancer and the recriminations that follow. What’s distinct in The Broken Circle Breakdown is the setting: the banjo-fired
Books
Thursday, March 20, 2014

Author Paul McComas turns his novel into a concert

  Inner peace and social justice, not unlike the personal and the political, should never be entirely separate. That’s one theme in Paul McComas’ 2002 novel, Unplugged. After publication, the Milwaukee-turned-Evanston, Ill., author refitted his story of Dayna Clay, a suicidal young woman