Home / Tag: author
Monday, Nov. 19, 2012

Guide offers tips for writing creative nonfiction

  No one knows exactly who coined the term "creative nonfiction," though author and writing teacher Lee Gutkind staked his claim on the phrase when he founded a literary journal by the same name in 1993. In fact, Vanity Fair
Monday, Nov. 19, 2012
 "Taliesin is a house in three acts," declares the preface of Building Taliesin: Frank Lloyd Wright's Home of Love and Loss, a new book by Madison journalist Ron McCrea that tells the fascinating story of this famous residence
Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012

Also: ‘Wimpy Kid’ author visits Oconomowoc

Given the prominence of women’s rights in the recently completed presidential campaign, it is a good time to take a look at the role that women play in the White House. In the timely new volume Women and the White House
Monday, Nov. 5, 2012

A geologist investigates ‘Noah’s Flood’

 In some polls, nearly half of all Americans believe the Earth is only 6,000 years old and was once entirely covered by Noah’s flood, which left behind the mountain ranges and canyons that constitute the topography of our world.
Monday, Nov. 5, 2012
 Over the course of his prolific 20-year writing career, Sherman Alexie has given us a view into the modern American-Indian experience through favorites such as The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven and
Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012
Though most people know Ina Garten as the contented, reassuringly soft-spoken host of the Food Network’s long-running “Barefoot Contessa,” she considers her television gig secondary to her true career as a cookbook...
Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
 Nations once aspired to have a middle class as strong as the one in the United States. However, as Salon editor Joan Walsh argues in her new release, What’s the Matter With White People: Why We Long for a Golden Age...
Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012

Discovery, melancholy in ‘Waging Heavy Peace,’ a poetically detailed memoir

At age 66, Neil Young is reaching an artistic zenith. Young recently released the album Americana with his longtime band Crazy Horse, and the end of this month will see yet another Crazy Horse album, Psychedelic Pill...
Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012
 Set along the shores of Lake Superior in Duluth, Minn., The Lighthouse Road by Peter Geye recreates life in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as it tells the tale of backwoods logging and bootlegging through tragic characters...
Monday, Oct. 8, 2012

An alphabetical walk through classic compositions

 The great thing about jazz, one of America’s distinct contributions to the world’s culture, is that it’s always changing—not just year to year, but also performance to performance. At least that’s the line from some...
Monday, Oct. 8, 2012
  They say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but few could argue against the magnificent artistry that is captured in Paul Bialas’ photography book Pabst: An Excavation of Art. The book focuses on the...
Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012
 Two founding members of Milwaukee’s late Theatre X, Conrad Bishop and Elizabeth Fuller, recently released Co-Creation: Fifty Years in the Making, a profound memoir based on five decades of cooperating as partners...
Friday, Sept. 28, 2012
 Jonathan Kozol is the author of Fire in the Ashes: Twenty-Five Years Among the Poorest Children in America, a powerful work that follows a hardened group of impoverished inner-city children he has known...
Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012
In Jonathan Evison's The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving, we are introduced to Benjamin Benjamin, a character at the end of his rope. Benjamin has had a rash of bad luck, including the loss of his wife, his family and his livelihood. With no options...
Monday, Aug. 27, 2012

Letters and journals of the controversial psychiatrist

Where's the Truth? Letters and Journals, 1948-1957 (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), edited by Mary Boyd Higgins, is the fourth and final installment culled from the writings of highly...
Monday, Aug. 27, 2012
After being married to ABC News correspondent Peter Jennings for almost 15 years, Kati Marton met the love of her life in U.S. Ambassador Richard Holbrooke. These stories and more...
Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012
Sean Chercover, author of the Chicago-based thrillers Big City, Bad Blood and Trigger City, brings readers a new crime drama that mixes mystery and intrigue with unpredictable twists and fascinating plotlines. The Trinity Game, full of heart-pounding action...
Monday, Aug. 6, 2012

McCrea shares love and loss of Frank Lloyd Wright

The 1914 fire that consumed portions of Frank Lloyd Wright's Taliesin compound along with seven lives may have been sparked by racism. The servant who set the blaze and attacked the houseguests with a hatchet, Julian Carlton...
Monday, Aug. 6, 2012
Witchcraft, war, murder and romance abound in The Orphanmaster, the debut novel by Jean Zimmerman. Set in 1663 New Amsterdam (present-day Manhattan), The Orphanmaster tells the story of orphaned Blandine van Couvering...
Tuesday, July 31, 2012

'Season of the Witch' explores the Weird City on the West Coast

If New York is the City that Never Sleeps and Chicago is the Second City, San Francisco emerges in our collective consciousness as the nation's Weird City. Forever synonymous with the 1960s and the “Summer of Love,” San Francisco...
Tuesday, July 31, 2012
Ron Tanner, author of the critically acclaimed books Kiss Me, Stranger and A Bed of Nails, debuts another noteworthy title, From Animal House to Our House. Through honest reflection and humor, Tanner recounts his and his then-girlfriend's efforts...
Monday, July 23, 2012

Crime novelist appears at Mystery One

Charles “Shake” Bouchon thought that escaping to exotic Belize and opening a small restaurant on the beach would be the perfect way to leave behind his life of crime. However, trouble seems to follow Shake, the lead character in Lou Berney...
Monday, July 16, 2012

Novelist Mantel returns to reign of Henry VIII, Cromwell

In an afterword to her second novel about Thomas Cromwell, Hilary Mantel writes that there is still uncharted territory in his character. I wonder what it could be. Her portrait of him in Wolf...
Tuesday, July 3, 2012
Selected by The New York Times' Book Review as a 2011 “Notable Book of the Year,” Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness is an unforgettable memoir by author Alexandra Fuller. In this firsthand account, Fuller takes readers to the continent...
Monday, June 25, 2012
Milwaukee-born Joy Stocke and Michigan native Angie Brenner met on the balcony of a guesthouse on the Mediterranean coast of Turkey. After discovering a shared love of travel, history, cuisine and literature, they began a 10-year journey...
Tuesday, June 19, 2012
Local author Matthew Flynn pits Milwaukee versus Washington in the fast-paced, funny novel Pryme Knumber. Fifteen-year-old Bernie Weber is just an ordinary high-school student until he is discovered by the CIA, Washington and Yale for his...
Monday, June 11, 2012
In Herself When She's Missing, local author Sarah Terez Rosenblum paints a portrait of a tumultuous female relationship that involves mid-20s protagonist Andrea and her on-again, off-again girlfriend, Jordan. Through clever metaphors...
Monday, June 4, 2012

Informative look at reporters covering WWII

“If you ever have to go to war,” Walter Cronkite said late in life, “don't go by glider.” Gliders in wartime do not always glide the way they are supposed to, and the canvas-covered, aluminum-framed one carrying Cronkite to cover Operation Market...
Monday, June 4, 2012

Bakopoulos explores 1967 military coup through family's eyes

In 1967, a military coup toppled the Greek government and ushered in a seven-year period of devastating domestic brutality and repression...
Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Novelist Alex Gilvarry fashions a winning satire

From the Memoirs of a Non-Enemy Combatant (Viking Adult) is Alex Gilvarry's fictional indictment of Homeland Security's post-9/11 paranoia. The book's hero, Boyet...
Monday, May 14, 2012

Genre master Philip Kerr pens another gem

What an unusual household Philip Kerr's must be, what with his wife and children presumably living a fairly conventional life in contemporary Britain and he a most unconventional one in the middle of Europe in the middle of the previous century...
Monday, May 14, 2012
The sunny city of Miami takes center stage in Diana Abu-Jaber's engrossing new novel, Birds of Paradise. The Florida hot spot becomes the backdrop for a dynamic familial tale of identity, loss and forgiveness. The Muirs are a typical yet fractured...
Tuesday, April 17, 2012
With more than 11 million supporters in the United States, the Humane Society is doing its part to ensure a hopeful future for animals by helping to connect them with loving people. Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of the...
Monday, April 9, 2012

Plus: Earth Poets at Urban Ecology Center

Joshua Clover is an accomplished writer, critic, teacher and journalist specializing in poetry and poetics, with an emphasis on the contemporary. Clover, who currently teaches in the Department of English at UC-Davis, is the author of two books of poems...
Monday, March 19, 2012
As its name implies, Benjamin Busch's stunning new memoir Dust to Dust is largely a meditation on life and death. Although Busch is a decorated Marine Corps officer who served two tours of duty in Iraq, Dust to Dust is much more than a war memoir...
Monday, March 12, 2012

Kevin Fox to appear in Oconomowoc

Myth, belief, identity and lasting love are all themes in Kevin Fox's Until the Next Time. When 21-year-old Sean Corrigan receives a journal belonging to an uncle he didn't even know existed, he embarks on a journey across the Atlantic—and across...
Wednesday, March 7, 2012
Spring doesn't officially begin until later this month, but activity is already blooming at the local Woodland Pattern Book Center, where this week offers an array of outstanding author readings for the poetry enthusiast. First on the docket is the “Portals...
Monday, Feb. 27, 2012

Photography book captures South Side landmark

Whether or not it was life-changing, Philip “Philo” Kassner's first encounter with a South Side landmark became a second encounter and then a third—until the...
Monday, Feb. 20, 2012

Eleanor Henderson to appear at Boswell

Eleanor Henderson's eye-opening Ten Thousand Saints is an emotional tale filled with vulnerable young characters amid hard-edged settings. Ten Thousand Saints tells the story of Jude Keffy-Horn, a young boy coming of age in Vermont...
Monday, March 24, 2008

Interview with Tod Wodicka

The munificent title of Tod Wodicka’s debut novel, All Shall Be Well and All Shall Be Well, and All manner of Things Shall Be Well hints at the desperate optimism of it’s wretched protagonist: Burt Hecker, a mead-swilling, tunic-sporting 20th century idler stuck in a medieval past. From his home in Berlin, Germany, Wodicka talks about his new book.
Monday, March 24, 2008

Interview With Kevin Brockmeier

There’s an indelible quality to Kevin Brockmeier’s writing that has earned him such accolades as the O. Henry Award and the Italo Calvino Short Fiction Award. In his new collection of stories, View From the Seventh Layer, he further cements his reputation for creating slender and solemn prose that blends the fantastical with the everyday. He talks to us about this, his second collection of short stories for adults:
Sunday, March 9, 2008

Today @ the Mequon Schwartz Bookshop - 2:00 PM

Laurel Gray seems to have it all: a successful marriage, an accomplished daughter, and a beautiful house with a pool. Unfortunately, the body of a dead girl turns up in that pool and upsets Gray’s seemingly picture perfect life. Complicating things, Gray’s own daughter seems to have played a role in the dead girl’s drowning . . .
Tuesday, March 4, 2008

Interview with Jodie Picoult

No stranger to difficult moral issues that society likes to avoid discussing, Jodi Picoult’s new book, Change of Heart, deals with capital punishment, religious dogma, the crippling loss of a loved one and the fact people can surprise you in ways you’d least expect. She talks to us about this, her 15th novel to date.
Thursday, Feb. 28, 2008

Interview with Jessica Mills

How many parent guides have you come across that are geared towards the progressive punk parent? Author/Activist/musician/ teacher Jessica Mills talks about her new book, My Mother Wears Combat Boots—a parenting manual that ventures into territory most mainstream parenting books fear to tread.
Friday, Feb. 22, 2008

Interview with Manil Suri

In his first novel, The Death of Vishnu, Manil Suri used Hindu mythology and the tinsely allure of the Bollywood film industry to explore the lives of characters inhabiting a Mumbai apartment building. His second novel, The Age of Shiva, continues the tradition, affirming his talent for creating well-drawn characters and sensitive prose.

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