Home / Tag: MSO
Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2009

Classical Review

Gilbert Varga, guest conductor of last weekend's Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra concerts, is an impressive presence on the podium. He leads with supreme musicianship, care, insight, taste and style. Most important, he seems an able communicator to the orchestra. From memory Varga led Haydn's Symphony No. 73 ("La Chasse") with understanding of the composer's wit and playfulness. It was a thoughtful, tight, spontaneous performance. Varga's versatility...
Thursday, Jan. 15, 2009

Tonight @ the Marcus Center - 7 p.m.

The Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra and conductor Gilbert Varga present a 7 p.m. performance tonight at the Marcus Center titled “Transfiguration,” featuring Mozart’s Horn Concerti Nos. 1 and 2 as well as Strauss’ Tod und Verklarung, but not before hosting a 5:30 p.m. pre-show reception with live jazz, appetizers and beer samples from the...
Saturday, Jan. 3, 2009

Tonight @ the Marcus Center - 8 p.m.

As part of a program billed as “Breaking Through to Joy,” the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, with four vocal soloists, will perform Beethoven's Ninth, one of the composers most beloved compositions, followed by the Concerto for Bassoon and Orchestra in B-Flat Major, K. 191 by W.A. Mozart (1756-91). This is a work Mozart composed when he was 18 years old for an instrument that had only recently been developed. The soloist for this work will be Theodore Soluri. Conducting tonight’s 8 p.m. performance at the Marcus Center...
Friday, Jan. 2, 2009

Tonight @ the Marcus Center - 8 p.m.

As part of a program billed as “Breaking Through to Joy,” the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, with four vocal soloists, will perform Beethoven's Ninth, one of the composers most beloved compositions, followed by the Concerto for Bassoon and Orchestra in B-Flat Major, K. 191 by W.A. Mozart (1756-91). This is a work Mozart composed when he was 18 years old for an instrument that had only recently been developed. The soloist for this work will be Theodore Soluri. Conducting tonight’s 8 p.m. performance at the Marcus Center...
Wednesday, June 18, 2008

Gufs, MSO offer free summer concert series

In 1969, the band Deep Purple made history by performing Jon Lord’s Concerto for Group and Orchestra with The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in London. Since then, Metallica has performed live with the San Francisco Symphony, KISS has collaborated with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra and indie groups like Belle & Sebastian and The Decemberists have joined the Los Angeles Philharmonic on stage. Milwaukee adds a new chapter to the history of symphony-rock this summer with a series of four free concerts featuring live performances by The Gufs and the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra. The beloved local band and world-renowned orchestra will join forces at Boerner Botanical Gardens at 7 p.m., June 25; the Lake Michigan . . .
Tuesday, June 3, 2008

Classical Preview

“Fate blessed him when he was baptized with the perfect name—Felix,” said Robert Schumann when describing fellow composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-47). Mendelssohn grew up in the midst of wealth and calm, and to a great extent his music reflects a Romantic spirit, but also great emotional tranquility. Few think him innovative, yet to a large degree Mendelssohn is to be credited with saving the piano concerto from being snuffed out. By 1830, composers like Hummel, Thalberg and Moscheles had brought the piano concerto to something of an artistic dead end, but Mendelssohn, sensing the crisis, drafted his own such effort in 1831, managing therein to breathe new life into a moribund musical genre.
Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Triple-Header

The exciting season finale of the Milwaukee Ballet Company presented three pieces, including a beautiful world premiere by Artistic Director Michael Pink. At the post-party, Pink happily announced that the company’s firm financial footing was aided by angel Bob Dohmen.
Tuesday, May 20, 2008

Violinist Hilary Hahn at the MSO

Violinist Hilary Hahn is an artist who seems to have emerged on the classical scene like a rare plant fully grown—an entity so perfectly and unobtrusively developed that the effortless maturity of her craft belies her youthful years. Born in Lexington, Va., 28 years ago, she began playing the violin shortly before her fourth birthday, studied for years under Russian teacher Klara Berkovich and made her first major orchestral debut with the Baltimore Symphony in 1991, when she was 12. Soon after, she appeared with the Philadelphia Orchestra, then the Cleveland, followed by the Pittsburgh and the New York Philharmonic, all by the tender age of 15. Next she would debut in Germany, playing Beethoven with the Bavarian Radio Symphony under Lorin Maazel.
Tuesday, May 13, 2008

Classical Review

There aren’t many real stars among instrumentalists in classical music today. Cellist Yo-Yo Ma is at the top of the list. In a gala performance with Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra last Wednesday night Ma portrayed Cervantes’ demented hero in Richard Strauss’ Don Quixote as convincingly as any dramatized version. We expect beautiful tone and masterful phrasing from Ma. I wasn’t prepared for his depth of humanity in this piece and overwhelming musical acting, portraying the character’s swoons, groans and palpable longing. The Don’s aching idealism ended with a heartbreaking death scene from Ma.
Saturday, April 12, 2008

Tonight @ Uihlein Hall - 8:00 PM

One of Charlie Chaplin’s most overtly romantic films, City Lights not only starred and was written by Chaplin, but it was also scored by the enduring silent film actor. Particularly during the film’s storied final scene, the swelling musical accompaniment conveys grand emotions that the down-to-earth characters on . . .

0|6