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12.31.1969 | | Posted at 06:00 PM
By Russ Bickerstaff
  It was my last show before a weekend with the APT . . . a local production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream that Carte Blanche Studios. And., as usual, there wasn’t room in the print review to mention everything . . . here are a few impressions that didn’t make it into a far more concise review of the show . . . (and some that might’ve.)--Clayton Hamburg’s Puck looks and moves exactly t...
12.31.1969 | | Posted at 06:00 PM

Soulstice Theatre’s Complete Works Of William Shakespeare

By Russ Bickerstaff
  Soulstice Theatre’s  The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)  is fun. It may not be perfect. They kind of drop the ball on the physical comedy of Shakespeare’s histories presented as a football game. The Othello rap is a bit more wince-inducing than one might hope for. With a show as fast-paced as The Complete Works, individual moments get washed-out in the rhythm of an ...
12.31.1969 | | Posted at 06:00 PM

Free Performance of Shakespeare’s Greatest Hits in A Third Ward Gallery.

By Russ Bickerstaff
It’s a spacious studio space in the Third Ward/Walker’s Point area of town. Classy, old white wood and white brick marred only slightly by some pseudo-sorta-kinda Jackson Pollock paintings to my right. A large audience sits on white wooden folding chairs for Goats & Monkeys’ Thursday night staged reading of Hamlet. It may not be a fully staged production of Shakespeare’s classic, but th...
06.28.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Russ Bickerstaff
The annual June trip too Spring Green for American Players Theatre has been lengthened a bit by their current budget. Having canceled their June matinees, out-of-towners looking to take in all three of the early season shows end up staying for three consecutive evenings. On touring the APT’s new indoor theatre space which opens up in only a few days, my theory that the lack of matinees had somet...
Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Carte Blanche Studios’ summer shuffle

Last summer featured two major productions of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream staged in Wisconsin, each taking place in a remote corner of the state. First up was American Players Theatre with a cleverly crafted, contemporary outdoor production in Spring Green, complete with a beautiful set by an award-winning scenic designer from Chicago. Later in the season, Door Shakespeare staged a much more intimate...
06.20.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Russ Bickerstaff
Wisconsin’s Loose Canon Theatre Company has been around for a few years. (Evidently there’s one in Dublin that’s been around for quite a bit longer. And why not? It's a really clever name) According to the Wisconsin company’s profile, the local group was founded in ’05 by Brian Rott and a few others in the UW-Parkside Theatre Department. Their latest production is a staging of Shakesp...
05.03.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Russ Bickerstaff
A free reading of Shakespeare by professional actors (a few of them union professionals) is going to attract a large audience. When my wife and I arrived at the Live Artists Have To Eat Studio, we weren’t surprised. It was packed. Lying somewhere between the Third Ward and the southern end of the theatre district, the Live Artists Studio is a trendy-looking studio space complete with bar. Seats ...
Sunday, Sept. 14, 2008

Today @ the Broadway Theatre Center - 2 p.m.

Past scholars have often decried Love's Labour's Lost as wholly insignificant, a self-indulgent piece by William Shakespeare before he moved on to more serious work. More recently, Cambridge University's Anne Barton described the play as "relentlessly Elizabethan," with dialogue that is mostly inaccessible to . . .
Friday, Sept. 12, 2008

Tonight @ the Broadway Theatre Center - 7:30 p.m.

Past scholars have often decried Love's Labour's Lost as wholly insignificant, a self-indulgent piece by William Shakespeare before he moved on to more serious work. More recently, Cambridge University's Anne Barton described the play as "relentlessly Elizabethan," with dialogue that is mostly inaccessible to . . .
Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2008

Theater Review

Though Shakespeare often suffers at the hands of modernized productions, Love's Labour's Lost is usually an exception. Many directors have successfully set the play in the not-too-distant past, bringing the action closer to the audience's experience to offer a more accessible reading, but not so close they can't survey the characters and themes with some level of temporal detachment.

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