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Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2008

(Milwaukee Art Museum/University of Wisconsin), by Cheryl Robert

Milwaukee was fertile ground for arts and architecture in the early 20th century, with many ideas transplanted from Europe. The new expanded edition of The Domestic Scene examines the work of George Niedecken, perhaps best known for collaborating with Frank Lloyd Wright, but also a significant force in his own right . . .
Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2008

Extraordinary debut by Wisconsin novelist

Some books are written in such exquisite detail that even if you somehow don't care for the overall story, you can't help but enjoy reading them. Robert Coover provided a perfect example with The Universal Baseball Association Inc., J. Henry Waugh, Prop., in which the title character, a disappointed accountant, spends his solitary nights immersed in his own world, manipulating a kind of fantasy baseball league of his own creation wherein every action is determined by throws of the dice. Even if the book wasn't your cup of tea, you would still be fascinated by the complexities of the baseball league and the lives of its players.
Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2008

Tonight @ the Mequon Schwartz Bookshop - 7 p.m.

Set in a small, southern town in the 1970s, Mequon author Lesley Kagen’s second novel, Land of a Hundred Wonders, follows a young reporter struggling with her profession as the result of brain damage she suffered after a childhood car accident that killed both of her parents. She figures she’s found her big break . . .
Wednesday, July 30, 2008

Book Preview

When the Japanese army invaded Burma during World War II, 10-year-old Prem Sharma and his family were among the thousands of refugees who fled to safety in India. Not long afterwards they found themselves embroiled in another bloody conflict: the violent partition of Pakistan and India and the latter’s hard-won independence from century-long colonial rule.
Wednesday, July 23, 2008

Book Preview

The stage is almost set for the world’s greatest sporting event, the Olympic Games. As China fends off attacks against its human rights record while battling the unsightly algae on its beaches, it might be heartened by the thought that a Pulitzer prize-winning author could one day invest the 2008 Beijing Olympics . . .
Wednesday, July 23, 2008

Tonight @ the Brookfield Schwartz Bookshop - 7 p.m.

Meg Waite Clayton proudly embraces chick-lit conventions in her latest novel, The Wednesday Sisters, the story of five longtime friends who form a writers circle and relive stories from their decades of experiences. Clayton reads from the book tonight at 7 p.m. at the Brookfield Schwartz Bookshop location.
Wednesday, July 16, 2008

Tonight @ the Shorewood Schwartz Bookshop - 7 p.m.

In Lin Enger’s latest novel, Undiscovered Country, a boy’s grieving process after his father’s death on a hunting trip is complicated by doubts about whether his father’s alleged suicide was actually a murder—and a nagging suspicion that the boy’s own uncle is the culprit. With the aid of a troubled girl, the boy . . .
Tuesday, July 15, 2008

Book Preview

As Russia shakes off the torpor of the ’90s and resumes its place as an economic power, a new thriller by Brent Ghelfi returns readers to the seedy underbelly of post-Soviet society. In Volk’s Shadow—a sequel to Ghelfi’s 2007 book Volk’s Game—the grim, battle-hardened anti-hero of the first story returns, this time in search of a Faberg egg that turns out to be a red herring in a deeper plot concerning atrocities carried . . .
Monday, July 14, 2008

Tonight @ the Mequon Schwartz Bookshop - 7 p.m.

Mystery author Robert Crais returned to one of his most popular creations for his latest thriller, Chasing Darkness: his wisecracking sleuth Elvis Cole. In this installment of the ongoing saga, Cole is lionized after helping exonerate an innocent man—but three years later, that man turns up dead and Cole is placed . . .
Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Roxy Music’s serious fun

Roxy Music was too slippery and evasive to comfortably fit into any of the usual niches of their time or ours. They flirted with glam and skirted art rock without fully committing themselves to the conventions of either. They were avant-garde and pop. The voice of Bryan Ferry was at once ironic and romantic. American audiences were baffled, at least until a touch of Roxy seeped into the mainstream through their influence on The Cars and other new wave acts...

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