Home / Tag: history
Monday, March 12, 2012

Life, writings captured in 'Everything Is an Afterthought'

Paul Nelson was one of the first critics to analyze popular music with the seriousness that had previously been reserved for classical and jazz. All of the notable, first-generation rock critics such as Lester Bangs, Ellen Willis, Richard Meltzer...
Wednesday, July 7, 2010
Solomon Juneau, Milwaukee’s first mayor, scores pretty high as far as founding fathers go. Born in 1793 in Repentigny, Quebec Province, Canada, a small farming community near Montreal, Juneau signed up as a voyageur at the age of 15 or 16. Voyageurs were crew members hired to man canoes that carried trade goods...
05.20.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Russ Bickerstaff
The usual people who were out front of the Alchemist Theatre before a show weren’t smoking. On closer inspection, they weren’t even the usual people . . . They were roughly half as tall as Alchemist’s usual street slouchers and considerably younger. I was going in for an early evening’s performance of a theatrical presentation by The Upper Elementary Class of the Downtown Montessori School...
Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2008

(National Geographic) edited by Fredrik Hiebert and Pierre Cambo

Museum work can be dangerous business. Just ask the staff of the Baghdad Museum, looted as U.S. troops looked on, or the National Museum in Kabul, whose curators had to conceal their collection from the Soviets and the Taliban. Hidden Treasures is the catalog to an exhibit traveling across the United States, a dazzling...
Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2008

Mr. Gatling’s weapon

When it comes to the Gatling gun, perhaps Confederate soldiers put it best: "The Yankees have a gun you load on Monday and shoot all the rest of the week." And that statement stemmed from limited observation, as the gun, despite its deadly effectiveness, was little used in the Civil War. The , patented in November 1862 by Richard Jordan Gatling, was "the world's first machine gun that actually worked," Julia Keller writes in Mr. Gatling's Terrible Marvel: The Gun That Changed Everything and the Misunderstood Genius Who Invented It (Viking). Though the man behind it has become obscure, "Gatling gun" is still heard as a metaphor for swift, unchecked activity; "gat," the slightly outdated slang for a handgun, derives from it . . .
Wednesday, July 30, 2008

(University of Wisconsin), by Emil Fackenheim

German Jews were a small but significant minority, contributing greatly to their country’s culture until they were murdered or driven to exile by Hitler. Emil Fackenheim escaped shortly before the outbreak of World War II and became a philosophy professor at the University of Toronto and a rabbi serving the local Jewish community . . .
Monday, May 26, 2008

Today @ the Forest Home Cemetery - 11:30 a.m.

Every year, famous figures from Milwaukee’s past rise from the dead and gather at the Forest Home Cemetery seeking brains. This annual event isn’t quite as Romero-esque as it sounds, though: The dead people are played by actors, and the brains they seek belong to those they wish to educate. Costumed guides . . .
Tuesday, May 20, 2008

Tonight @ the Mequon Schwartz Bookshop - 7 p.m.

To Maggi McCormick Gordon, quilts aren’t just decorative blankets; they’re historical artifacts, each one of them with a unique backstory. In her new book, American Folk Art Quilts, Gordon examines 25 quilts from the Wisconsin State Historical Society, sharing their history and, for those who are more interested in making . . .
Thursday, Jan. 24, 2008

Germany on the brink

You could almost suppose that Germany had no past before 1933, so massively does the Third Reich overwhelm popular thought and historical writing about the country. But it does, and one of the most interesting periods is the one immediately preceding . . .

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