Home / Tag: Charles Allis Art Museum
Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2009
Nature provides the inspiration for two artists this week, when Natalie Settles opens her exhibit Feb. 4 at the Charles Allis Art Museum and Brook Slane premieres his work Feb. 7 at Tory Folliard Gallery. Both artists display their expertise for capturing the wonder of the natural world. "The Natural Motif: New Drawings by Natalie Settles" presents Settles' meditative graphite and watercolor artwork, which shifts in style between...
Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2009

Tonight @ the Charles Allis Art Museum - 7:30 p.m.

Through February, the Charles Allis Art Museum pays homage to one of the most enduring genres of film: love stories. The first flick in the series, which screens tonight at 7:30 p.m., is Love Me Tonight, the groundbreaking Jeanette MacDonald/Maurice Chevalier musical about a tailor smitten with a princess. The Rogers and Hart score includes some of their most beloved songs, like “Isn’t It Romantic” and “Lover.” The film’s...
Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2008

Today @ the Charles Allis Art Museum

The concepts of shadows, abstract shapes and spatial relationships are all explored in the current Charles Allis Art Museum exhibit on John Heymann, “At a Moment’s Notice: The Photographs of John Heymann,” which runs through Sept. 21. Heymann, a photo-journalist featured in The New York Times and The Boston . . .
Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2008

Today @ the Charles Allis Art Museum

The concepts of shadows, abstract shapes and spatial relationships are all explored in the current Charles Allis Art Museum exhibit on John Heymann, “At a Moment’s Notice: The Photographs of John Heymann,” which runs through Sept. 21. Heymann, a photo-journalist featured in The New York Times and The Boston Globe . . .
Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2008

Art Review

Shadows. Abstract shapes. Spatial Relationships. These concepts, portrayed in intimate photographs, describe the work of John Heymann exhibited at the Charles Allis Museum with “At a Moment’s Notice: The Photographs of John Heymann” through Sept. 21. Heymann, a photojournalist featured in The New York Times and The Boston Globe, displays approximately . . .
Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2008

Tonight @ the Charles Allis Art Museum - 7:30 p.m.

After a long run producing hit musicals, MGM ran out of magic in the 1960s and squandered much of its reputation, but not before producing one last critical and commercial hit: 1958’s Gigi, a film so beloved by audiences at the time that it won a whooping nine Academy Awards, including one for Best Picture . . .
Wednesday, July 9, 2008

Tonight @ the Charles Allis Art Museum

Often the classic films the Charles Allis Art Museum screens are of the slightly obscure variety, but tonight’s selection is familiar to most film lovers: It’s Rebecca, the 1940 psychological thriller that won director Alfred Hitchcock his first—and, criminally, his only—Best Picture Oscar. Joan Fontaine plays a young...
Monday, July 7, 2008

Rebecca returns to Manderley

“Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again,” begins the narrator at the opening of Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca. The woman speaking, the heroine of the emotionally harrowing classic, is never named. And that is only one of many intriguing twists in a movie that has lost none of its fascination over time. The title character of the 1940 film is never seen but always present. The woman called Rebecca died before the story begins...
Wednesday, June 18, 2008

Tonight @ the Charles Allis Art Museum - 7:30 p.m.

Film legends Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers appeared in 10 films together, but they weren’t the top-billed stars in all of them. In 1935’s Roberta, which screens tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the Charles Allis Art Museum, Astaire and Rogers were still supporting actors. Irene Dunne stars as an assistant at a dress shop who captures . . .
Thursday, June 12, 2008

Today @ the Charles Allis Art Museum

George McCormick fathoms himself a storyteller, but his medium is unorthodox. Instead of relying on the written or spoken word, he uses sculpture and woodcarvings. Found objects both natural and man-made work their way into his pieces, which convey autobiographical incidents, Biblical tales and traditional African . . .

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