Home / Tag: Previews
Wednesday, June 25, 2008

Book Preview

We’re all familiar with the agonizing scenario: the family dining table that serves as a battleground; the television set (and, increasingly, the Internet) that serves as a palliative and the drugs, alcohol or infidelity that serve as emotional props. American popular culture and literature is resplendent with memorably dysfunctional families, whether it’s through the writings of Eugene O’Neill and Raymond Carver or animated TV hits like “The Simpsons” and “Family Guy.” The success of shows like “The Osbournes” reveals the delight that viewers take in seeing other people’s dirty laundry aired in public.
Wednesday, June 18, 2008

Dance Preview

In a chamber experience of dance mixed with visuals, three different media will be featured in UW-Milwaukee’s Dance Triptych, opening this week at Kenilworth Square East Gallery. A trio of UWM faculty collaborated on the project, bringing diverse talents and inspirations to the performance. The paintings and visuals of Leslie Vansen explore the meaning of human existence and the indelible footprint it leaves on the planet. Patterned and repetitive movements heighten the sensory experience of attendees as they pass through the labyrinth in which the works are displayed and performed . . .
Wednesday, June 18, 2008

Book Preview

Those of you who were courageous enough to attend the Locust Street Festival on a stormy June 8 had your hardiness rewarded with a performance by The Trusty Knife, a local band whose eclectic sound betrays a clear affinity for ’70s-inspired rock ’n’ roll with a somewhat glammy edge. When he’s not strumming . . .
Wednesday, June 11, 2008

Theater Preview

When celebrated playwright Eugene O’Neill wrote the humorous Ah, Wilderness! in the early 1930s, he had recently won his second Pulitzer Prize for Drama (Beyond the Horizon, 1920, Strange Interlude, 1928). Legend has it that the idea came to him in a dream and that he wrote the entire script in only five or six weeks. Wilderness is O’Neill’s only true comedy, and many have dismissed it as one of his lesser works—something he quickly banged-out before going on to serious works like The Iceman Cometh and Long Day’s Journey Into Night. But American Players Theatre (APT) in Spring Green is intrigued by that contrast in O’Neill’s style, and continues the early part of its season with a preview of Ah, Wilderness! on Friday, June 13.
Tuesday, May 20, 2008

Art Preview

Beginning May 28 at the Charles Allis Art Museum, George Ray McCormick Sr. juxtaposes his two visions of life in the retrospective “Journey from the Secular to the Spiritual: Works by George McCormick Sr.” The approximately 35 pieces include imaginative, finely crafted carvings, assemblages and sculptures that illustrate McCormick’s artistic transformation.
Wednesday, May 7, 2008

Classical Preview

They are called Le Mystere des Voix Bulgares, or translated, “The Mystery of the Bulgarian Voices.” As enigmatic as the name sounds, they are best known for the incredible sounds they produce, particularly when singing the multi-choral folk songs of their native Bulgaria. Composed of 26 performers, this all-female a capella ensemble is touring for the first time in 18 years, making a rare appearance at Milwaukee’s Pabst Theater, Friday, May 16. And the music they make is exceptional. Originally known as the Bulgarian State Television Female Vocal Choir, Le Mystere was first “discovered” . . .
Tuesday, May 6, 2008

Theater Preview

Countless love affairs have been cut short by death, but when it happens to someone famous, the tragedy is bound to capture the public’s imagination. In his successful drama Shadowlands, William Nicholson details the doomed romance between author C.S. Lewis and poet Joy Davidman. Acacia Theatre, operating from the campus of Concordia University, presents its production of the play this week.
Wednesday, April 30, 2008

Theater Preview

When American composer William Finn was diagnosed with a brain tumor, his career was taking off. His musical Falsettos had met with success on Broadway. The tumor nearly killed him. However, when he returned from the hospital, he found that he could not sit down at the piano without writing a good song. The near-death experience had jarred a sense of life into him that carried through the keyboard.
Sunday, April 20, 2008

Book Preview

The unmitigated awe that nature can inspire in the youthful imagination has been a subject of reflection for countless poets and authors. Transcendentalists like Walt Whitman ascribed an almost pious relevance to a child’s discovery of nature. It’s this sense of awe and wonder that writer Richard Louv believes is at stake in today’s youth, resulting largely from a dwindling contact with nature and an immersion in electronic media and structured play. In 2005 he published Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder, enumerating the many ills that arise when children are gradually divorced from the natural world.
Wednesday, April 16, 2008

Art Preview

As the city emerges from winter cold, a host of young artists emerge during Spring Gallery Night and Day. The Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design (MIAD) offers its senior exhibition featuring 145 design and fine art students. Exciting new Latino artists display their work at Walker’s Point Center for the Arts, and the Hotcakes Gallery showcases another six MARN Mentor 2008 award-winners. MIAD’s “2008 Senior Exhibition” features the vividly colored paintings of Brad Conklin, Katie Donoghue’s combinations of photographs and light boxes, Benjamin Rothschild’s sculpted metal toys, Julia Schilling’s dye-on-metal drawings coordinating with cast aluminum sculpture, Boris Ostrelov’s interactive mixed-media pieces, and Colin T. Dickson’s 31/2 Miles to the Center of Somewhere.

0|2