Home / Tag: CD Review
09.18.2008 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
Like the murder ballad or songs about cars, sad songs will always have a special place in the American songbook. This week is a great one for sad music, seeing the release of two wonderfully downtrodden albums from wildly different genres: Dead Confederate - "Wrecking Ball": This one is for everybody who has complained about what a wayward, elite genre indie-rock has become over the last ha...
05.27.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
Like so many other Danger Mouse albums, Dark Night of the Soul arrives with a back story that's nearly as interesting than the music. Danger Mouse�s collaboration with Sparklehorse and director David Lynch was marketed like a blockbuster movie, with mysterious, film-noir-inspired posters playing up Lynch�s involvement in the project and flaunting its roster: The Flaming Lips, James Mercer, Suzanne...
05.12.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
That The Church still have great albums in them isn't a surprise; they've already proven themselves one of the few bands unblemished by age. Each year the veteran rock band gets older, grayer, farther removed from their '80s stardom and ostensibly more out of touch with contemporary music, yet their output remains as vital as ever. But even coming on the heels of so many proud late period releases...
04.21.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
The best political rap tells hard truths. The worst tells obvious truths. Mr. Lif's new album, I Heard It Today, out today, tells the most obvious truths of all, the ones that are plastered above the fold on newspaper and stream 24-hours a day on cable news scrolls. Apparently, there's some sort of economic crisis. There's a great album to be made exploring the roots and the personal impac...
03.31.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
There's something disingenuous about the modern indie-folk scene, a movement dominated primarily by young city dwellers who grow (fashionable) beards, don (stylishly trim) flannel and hang out in the woods on the weekends (between touring cities). Their instrumentation says Americana, but their calculated, sometimes deliberately abstruse execution is coded to catch the ears of hipper, more educate...
03.04.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
If Conor Oberst must dedicate himself to a band that isn't Bright Eyes, couldn't he at least reunite Desaparecidos? This Mystic Valley Band that he's spent the last couple years with just isn't cutting it, yet Oberst doesn't seem to be getting the message, since he's doubled down on the project with his upcoming album, Outer South. This time Oberst leased out valuable album real e...
03.10.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
While most R&B singers coast in the final minute or two of their songs, reciting established hooks until the fadeout, The-Dream saves his finest twists for these closing moments. Three-fourths of the way through "Sweat it Out," the closest the singer's new album, Love Vs Money, comes to a conventional slow jam, the spell breaks when The-Dream begins yelling, realizing that something isn't right. A...
03.03.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
Cursive has laid out a novel pricing plan for its latest album, Mama, I'm Swollen. On Sunday, the band began selling 320 Kbps mp3s of the album for $1, raising the price a buck each day until it tops off at $9 on the album's release date. It's a clever incentive to get people to buy the album sooner than later, and maybe create a little buzz around the record. Here's hoping it works; this one de...
02.20.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
The cover art for U2�s No Line on the Horizon depicts what appears to be a line on the horizon, and sure enough, it portends an album rife with contradictions. As necessitated by the Internet, here�s my track-by-track insta-review. "No Line on the Horizon" opens the album promisingly with an enticing haze of electronics and grinding guitars. The track kicks hard without falling back on ...
02.17.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
I hate when this happens: A band improves by leaps and bounds between albums, with the implied promise of even better things to come�and then doesn't deliver. The latest offenders are Asobi Seksu, the beauty-seeking New York shoegaze band that thrilled reliably with their dynamic 2006 album Citrus. That they teased their new album, Hush, with their best single yet, "Me and Mary," a bloodrush of a ...

0|2