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Thursday, May 22, 2008

An interview with Panic at the Disco’s Ryan Ross

Call them Panic at the Disco 2.0. In the short time between their blockbuster debut album, A Fever You Can’t Sweat Out, the band almost entirely reinvented themselves. They dropped the pointless exclamation mark from their name; they gutted their overblown, circus-themed live show, and, most importantly, they exorcized their music of almost all its emo excesses. On their recently released sophomore . . .
Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Tonight @ the Rave - 8 p.m.

Are you not a fan of Scott Stapp? Neither were his bandmates, apparently. When the “don’t call us Christian”-rock band Creed split up, the rest of the band distanced themselves from Stapp as drastically as possible, forming a new band with a harder edge but an otherwise similar aesthetic. That band, Alter Bridge
Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Saturday, May 24, 2008

Not that they seem all that concerned about their legacy at this point, but The Cure made a mighty strong case for why they’re one of the greatest pop bands of all time—the greatest pop?—Saturday night with a super-sized concert that covered every phase of their 30-year career. The set was dominated by hits . . .
Tuesday, May 20, 2008
For every band that finds wealth, stardom and happiness after signing to a major label, there are countless others crushed by the experience. Rilo Kiley doesn’t quite fall into either camp, guitarist Blake Sennett explains. The band’s tenure on Warner Bros. has been pleasant enough—marked by friendly, helpful people and devoid of interference from calculating executives or other horrors—but, Sennett concedes, “In ways, we probably shouldn’t have made the leap to a major label. “It seemed like the next natural step, something we had to do to reach people, but I think it was probably a miscue,” Sennett adds. “I’m not going to say it was a mistake, but I’m not going to say it was … well, the opposite of a mistake.”
Tuesday, May 20, 2008

Sunday, May 18, 2008

After last night’s show at the Rave, I can finally understand (some of) the logic in the age-old myth that women are more attracted to pompous and conceited dudes. Like every other member of the near-capacity Sunday night crowd, I fell hard for The Hives, even after constant boasting rants from singer Howlin' Pelle Almqvist.
Friday, May 16, 2008

Tonight @ the Luckystar Studio - 6 p.m.

The Luckystar Studio at 5407 W. Vliet St., holds an opening reception for its newest exhibit tonight, collection of rock posters by prolific silk-screener Eric Von Munz, who has designed posters for Queens of the Stone Age and The White Stripes. The Reception begins at 6 p.m., with all limited-edition poster prints selling . . .
Thursday, May 15, 2008

Tonight @ Yield - 8 p.m.

Two of Milwaukee’s biggest active alternative-rock bands show their support for the social justice organization Community Shares of Greater Milwaukee (CSGM) tonight by playing a benefit event for the non-profit group at Yield. Fever Marlene and On a Sun headline the 8 p.m. all-night event, which will also feature . . .
Tuesday, May 13, 2008

Saturday, May 10, 2008

Having built a reputation on their sweaty and raw live marathons, Scott and Seth Avett are known for lathering their adoring fan base into a manic frenzy. Saturday's raucous performance at Turner Hall Ballroom was no exception, a blowout that left attendees extremely satisfied.
Tuesday, May 13, 2008
It is often taken for granted that hardcore punk is—and perhaps should be—the domain of the young. Young adulthood is a scary time for most of us, and what better way to express one’s youthful angst than by identifying with a music scene that embraces those feelings of alienation and confusion? I don’t think I would have made it through adolescence with my sanity intact without records like Black Flag’s Damaged and Minor Threat’s Out of Step. Those albums provided me with a useful outlet for my youthful rage and, perhaps more importantly, made me realize that I wasn’t the only one feeling so, well, out of step. At a time when one’s identity is incredibly unstable, any sense of community becomes paramount, and hardcore punk became the one place where I felt truly accepted.

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