Home / Tag: review
04.04.2014 | 12 days ago | Posted at 11:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
It’s not exactly news that sound shapes the way we perceive food. Restaurant owners have long understood that ambiance, including acoustics, can have nearly as much impact on the dining experience as food itself. Mostly the effect was thought to be psychological—when diners are in a good mood, they’re more likely to enjoy food and wine and everything in general—but recently researchers hav...
02.11.2014 | 64 days ago | Posted at 09:00 PM
By Evan Rytlewski
When Bloomberg News Service reported that MillerCoors was courting spirits drinkers with a new “bourbon-like lager” called Miller Fortune, the beer community begrudgingly awarded Miller points for innovation. While bourbon-flavored beers are fairly common in craft circles, there isn't one on the mass market yet, and Miller's marketing campaign suggesting the beer be savored not in a common pin...
10.23.2013 | | Posted at 11:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
I can’t recall the exact wording, but there’s a great quip about the way age shapes how we identify with music: Everybody believes that the greatest period for music just happened to occur when they were young. There’s a lot of truth to that, of course. Music never sounds quite so thrilling or important as it does during youth, where you're experiencing it for the first time and still fleshi...
Monday, Sept. 23, 2013

Sept. 20, 2013

With its homemade, public access aesthetic, simple premise and distinctly Midwestern lack of pretension, TV’s “Mystery Science Theater 3000,” which elevated bashing crappy Z-movies from a lat
Monday, March 4, 2013

March 2, 2013

Even winter has its “dog days,” and Milwaukee is in the slushy thick of them. Annoyingly low temperatures, mediocre pro basketball and a slow trickle of live music make these late-winter months particularly hard to get through. Coming to the rescue was Saturday’s East Side Music Tour, a day-long music festival that crammed 50 bands and hundreds of bodies into every conceivable cranny of Brady Street, bringing live music and a fresh crowd to a neighborhood known chiefly for its bar scene.  I showed up around 7, and, feeling like a kid who’d just been let loose at Disney World, hightailed it to the nearest festival-friendly establishment. Ivy Spokes hadn’t started at Crisp, and Into Arcadia was just finishing up at Hi Hat, but I struck on something at the Up and Under, where The Fatty Acids were already playing to a packed house. The stage at Up and Under would be small for most bands, and especially so for the hyperactive five-piece; but if anything, the close quarters made them sound even tighter than usual.  The night was still young as I made my way to Roman Coin to see Mortgage Freeman, a band I’d never heard but was prepared to like because of its name. It always made me think of a band you’d accidentally find in some townie dive, dressed business casual, playing on top of a pool table and covering the theme to “Family Matters.” Believe it or not, that’s exactly what I found when I walked into Roman Coin. After enjoying a few minutes of Freeman’s good-natured bar-prog, I trekked back to the Garage to see Paper Holland, whose lush pop is the musical equivalent of hot chocolate. The band played songs from its debut album Happy Belated, and while they seemed a bit nervous, the album’s pop sense and snappy guitar work (see: “Rory”) came through loud and clear. Across the street, Hello Death was tuning up at Rochambo. Tucked behind the railing of an upstairs balcony, the group played in the dark, silhouetted by the light from a window overlooking the street. The relaxed atmosphere of the tea house was perfect for Hello Death’s somber, intimate folk, making it one of the best performances of the night. While Hello Death dirged, D’Amato raged next door at Jo-Cat’s, which was so crowded that the staff was helpless to do anything about the cloud of smoke hanging over the room. D’Amato is a bona fide performer, and he worked the crowd while switching effortlessly from irreverent rap to golden-throated soul. His cover of Prince’s “How Come You Don’t Call Me Anymore” was a highlight. I hustled to Club Brady to get a spot for Jaill. The place was packed from door to stage and the anticipation was palpable. I have been to several Jaill shows in the last few months, and this was by far the best. The band seems to have finally settled into its new lineup, sounding muscular and confident, feeding off the raucous audience and busting out a great cover of Talking Heads’ “Wild Wild Life.” Could Brady Street be a legitimate live music destination? Are fanny packs cool again? Is Monta Ellis for real at point guard? The East Side Music Tour left festival-goers with plenty of burning questions, but one thing was certain Saturday night: There is a lot of great music being made in Milwaukee right now, and I think the hundreds of listeners who showed up to hear it—dog days be damned—would agree.
Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012

Road Poem

 Wahid is a pair of in-demand Los Angeles musicians who have worked with everyone from Ludacris to Leonard Cohen. On Road Poem, they explore the quiet back roads of the Near East in original compositions that pull...
Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012

The Hidden Treasures of Taj Mahal 1969-1973 (Columbia/Legacy)

 Harlem-folkie-wonder-cum-Chicago-blues-badass Taj Mahal gets the legend treatment as Columbia honors the singer/songwriter/storyteller’s back pages with a hidden treasures/stuff-we-haven’t-made-money...
Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012

The Sound of the Life of the Mind

Though it marks a homecoming of sorts, Ben Folds' reunion with his Ben Folds Five is hardly a course reversal. In the 13 years since the trio disbanded shortly after 1999's The Unauthorized Biography
Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2014
 I’m Art Kumbalek and man oh man manischewitz what a world, ain’a? So how ’bout this for a headline I saw the other day somewheres: “Water could be flowing on Mars now.” What the fock. The story says “researchers have found clues that water could be flowing in the present, at least during warm seasons
Monday, July 23, 2012

July 20, 2012

In hindsight, Gucci Mane would have been better off at a smaller venue. In a sign of either the Atlanta rapper's falling star or the many miscalculations of the promoters who booked the show on short notice and did little to advertise it, the en...
Thursday, July 12, 2012
Two Bucks may be a chain but it's a small one with only three venues, two in Ohio and now, one in Milwaukee. The newest Two Bucks (2321 N. Murray) is located in the former Dog's Bollocks and retains the same charm. Two Bucks refers to the price of...
Wednesday, July 11, 2012
Life for many can be an emotional train wreck, a collision of experiences and ideologies from which we stumble to pick up the pieces and get back on track. Try as they might, the three characters...
Monday, July 2, 2012

June 29, 2012

Summerfest can be unkind to indie bands, as the nuances associated with the genre are often swallowed up by cavernous stages and unforgiving sound systems (as well as audiences). At first glance, The Walkmen did not seem like a good fit...
Monday, June 4, 2012

June 3, 2012

<p>Imagine the songs of the soundtrack to one of your favorite movies&mdash;not necessarily a musical and from nearly 40 years ago&mdash;are revived on stage by current singers, the biggest star among whom is a boyishly handsome reality...
Monday, May 28, 2012

May 27, 2012

Last night's Stylez 2012 Statements of Hair and Fashion Show was an enormous event of music, fashion and community. It featured some of the most relevant urban fashions, designers and boutiques, including the likes of Bouchard's, Rochelle&#...
Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Novelist Alex Gilvarry fashions a winning satire

From the Memoirs of a Non-Enemy Combatant (Viking Adult) is Alex Gilvarry's fictional indictment of Homeland Security's post-9/11 paranoia. The book's hero, Boyet...
Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Oscar-Nominated film comes to Milwaukee

Film, movie, review, Milwaukee, Canada, Oscar, nomination, Monsieur Lazhar...
Friday, May 18, 2012

Sumud (Six Degrees)

“World music” is often a catchphrase for exotic mediocrity. Niyaz is among the great exceptions, a trio in cosmopolitan exile, retaining their Iranian roots but seamlessly fusing the quiet ecstasy of age-old melodies and rhythms with contemporary...
Friday, May 18, 2012

The Devil Ain't Got No Music (Aria B.G. Records)

Some blues musicians learn about music from attending church as children, later bringing gospel into blues music, while others start with blues music and bring that background into their spiritual songs. The older generations of musicians were...
Thursday, May 17, 2012

May 16, 2012

Given that opening bands are usually so eminently skippable, often just some underperforming label-mate of the main act, it's refreshing to come across a show that basically has two headliners. Beyond giving you more bang for your buck, it invit...
Monday, April 30, 2012

Slipstream (Redwing Records)

The two Dylan covers, both from Time Out of Mind, no less, reveal the state of Bonnie Raitt's old heart: full of appreciation, wonder and tough nostalgia for “the rest of us, who used to rule the world.” Sure, the smooth blues...
Monday, April 30, 2012

April 28, 2012

Despite the leering tone of the radio ads heralding her appearance at Milwaukee's Silk Exotic, Megan Daniels wasn't especially &quot;scantily clad&quot; in her appearance at the striptease club last Saturday. The plunging neckline a...
Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Canibalismo (Barbes/Crammed Discs)

Although the band is far away in time and place from the origins of the music that inspires them, New York City's Chicha Libre builds from a long-lost Peruvian genre, chichi—the sound of Latin music converging with the Swinging '60s...
Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Lincoln Has Won (Reel to Reel Records)

Few bands claiming the Americana label are as alive in the present as well as the past as The Habit. Lincoln Has Won opens with the rousing “War Is Done,” which reverberates with Dylan's...
Tuesday, April 24, 2012

A Story for Scheherazade

So wildly varied is the recording output of Milwaukee poet, singer, trumpeter and activist Harvey Taylor that one never knows where he will go from one album to the next. Inspired by last year's Middle Eastern uprisings, Taylor and various local...
Monday, April 23, 2012

'True Vine' biography details vital musician

Mike Seeger was a founding member of the folk-blues revival string band the New Lost City Ramblers as well as a distinguished solo artist, concentrating on early American music. He was a virtuoso on many instruments, such as banjo...
Monday, April 9, 2012

The Complete Bowdoin College Concert 1960 (Smithsonian Folkways)

Pete Seeger turns 93 in May, but he already seemed like an elder when he played Maine's Bowdoin College in 1960. His earnest and rather studious approach to folklore may seem unfashionable nowadays, yet Seeger was a brave and significant force...
Monday, April 9, 2012
“Vanishing Points: Explorations in Architecture and Identity” is the perfect exhibition for Walker's Point Center for the Arts (839 S. Fifth St.), and Executive Director Gary Tuma is the perfect guide for a tour. “We're very visible on this corner,” he observes...
Friday, April 6, 2012

April 5, 2012

"I didn't know it was possible for a person to throw up 10 times," Youth Lagoon's Trevor Powers told the crowd at Turner Hall Ballroom Thursday night, apologizing for a case of food poisoning he'd picked up on the road. The 2...
Monday, April 2, 2012
J.G. Ballard's final novel before his death in 2009 offers an almost apocalyptic picture of darkness festering in the shadows of suburbia and the emptiness of a society constructed only for consumption. A murder mystery and a bizarre shooting in...
Monday, April 2, 2012

Gottschall explains how narrative shapes our world

Jonathan Gottschall has written a smart, concise book on the history and implications of storytelling, providing a refreshing and insightful overview...
Thursday, March 29, 2012

Enjoy tasty, trendy food and house-made beer

Hinterland Erie Street Gastropub, an offshoot of the original Hinterland in Green Bay, became Milwaukee's first gastropub when it opened five years ago. Since then, it has done very well. The interior features an inviting bar and a dining room...
Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Twist

Bob Dylan handpicked this ragtag posse of vintage acoustic whizzes to open his 2009 tour of minor league baseball stadiums in an exercise in obscurity, eccentricity and, mostly, nostalgia. Named for an Irish street gang out of New York's old Five Points...
Tuesday, March 20, 2012
Across our nation, streets tagged “Main” are in dismal decay. Downtown Racine is no exception, as the county has been hit hard by the recession. That said, 441 Main St. in Racine shines like a beacon on the shores of Lake Michigan as the home of the...
Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Finding salvation in gritty Holocaust drama

“Poldek” Socha is a meaty-faced, crude man who cusses like a sailor as he navigates the sewers...
Monday, March 19, 2012

A Moment in Chiros (Nightmare Records)

Metal vocalist Lance King has come a long ways since his days of playing T.A. Vern's in the early '90s with the Minneapolis-based band Gemini. Over 21 years, he has fronted several other bands (most notably, Balance of Power)...
Thursday, March 15, 2012
The National (839 W. National Ave.) is a nice neighborhood café that serves breakfast and lunch. The menu, listed on chalkboards, is friendly to vegetarians. Breakfast options include a vegan burrito and omelets made from organic eggs. Be sure to try a side of...
Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Westfeldt's predictable but amusing romantic comedy

By now, the romantic comedy staffed with young professionals and set in Manhattan has...
Tuesday, March 13, 2012
I have written often in the last decade of the steady improvement in the quality of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra. Listening anew on Saturday evening I heard an ensemble moving into a new realm of refined excellence...
Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Lynden Sculpture Garden displays 'Midwestern Imagination'

The main salon of the Lynden Sculpture Garden is figuratively filled with Caribbean sea breezes from the new exhibition Haiti and the Midwestern Imagination. Imagination indeed, as layer after layer of fantasy is laid down in these bright, candy-colored...
Monday, March 12, 2012

Life, writings captured in 'Everything Is an Afterthought'

Paul Nelson was one of the first critics to analyze popular music with the seriousness that had previously been reserved for classical and jazz. All of the notable, first-generation rock critics such as Lester Bangs, Ellen Willis, Richard Meltzer...
Monday, March 12, 2012

Voice of Ages (Hear Music)

If the parallels weren't already evident, famed Irish folk band The Chieftains make it perfectly clear on Voice of Ages that Celtic music and U.S. folk, especially in its currently commercially palatable Americana guise, share more than a few chromosomes...
Wednesday, March 7, 2012
In Tandem's fine new production, Chaim Potok's The Chosen, thoughtfully illustrates the paradox of two highly principled young Orthodox Jews living in Brooklyn in households with completely...
Wednesday, March 7, 2012
Michael Gene Sullivan's adaptation taps into the disturbing universal elements of George Orwell's dystopian classic 1984. The play consists of two extended interrogation scenes separated by an intermission in a vivid Project Empty Space production...
Monday, March 5, 2012
Each month, Kenosha's Lemon Street Gallery (4601 Sheridan Road) features artists selected from the gallery's nonprofit, co-op membership. An accompanying reception is known as “Second Saturdays”—the next one takes place March 10...
Monday, Feb. 27, 2012

Holler and Stomp (Blind Pig)

Although almost all of the blues musicians who recorded on Chess and Sun Records in the 1950s are gone, the classic sounds of the era live on in Chicago's The Cash Box Kings. Holler and Stomp includes original members Joe Nosek, Chris “CB” Boeger...
Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2012

Dr. Seuss' subversive fairy tale

By now, several generations of children have been entertained and inspired by the whimsically subversive storybooks...
Monday, Feb. 27, 2012

Feb. 25, 2012

It seems almost quaint to think there was a time not that long ago where most Americans thought about rap and hip-hop in terms of an East Coast/West Coast binary. To be sure, even then it wasn't representative of the whole picture, but in the ye...
Monday, Feb. 20, 2012

The Lost Album

Mississippi Cactus' The Lost Album, recorded several years ago, before singer/guitarist Brian Kasprzak's temporary West Coast relocation, finds the Milwaukee band as musically diverse as their club-packing shows were lengthy—and those could run upward...
Friday, Aug. 5, 2011

Bateman and Reynolds Swap Bodies (And Bad Jokes)

What if you could trade your life for someone else's?
09.29.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
And with one lovely, understated gesture, The Avett Brothers' I and Love and You, Rick Rubin has nearly atoned for destroying Weezer. Lionized though the guy may be, Rubin is an overzealous producer, one whose vision sometimes trumps that of the artist he's recording. He's celebrated for returning Johnny Cash to his roots, but he also fed Cash some truly trite, overblown cover songs ("Bridg...
09.29.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
A guilty pleasure that grows less guilty and more pleasurable with each album, Paramore packs all the thrills of their male-fronted emo-rock peers, but leaves behind none of the slimy residue. The group�s latest, Brand New Eyes, out today, is their tightest and fiercest yet, a Trojan horse of a record with seemingly lightweight punk songs that disguise a whole lot of brute force. Most of the firep...
09.21.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
After a frequently exceptional run, Mariah Carey�s Memoirs of an Imperfect Angel closes with a flagrant vote of no-confidence in everything that came before it; a radio-baiting cover of the Foreigner power-balled �I Want to Know What Love Is� was apparently tacked on in a panic after the slow start of the album�s lead single, �Obsessed.� Of course, Carey hits the cover out of the park, but the vic...
12.31.1969 | | Posted at 06:00 PM
By Evan Rytlewski
All achy voice and crashing guitars, Montreal's Land of Talk play indie-rock the way it sounded early this century, before the mid-decade mutiny of synthesizers and cowboy hats. Land of Talk's sophomore album, Some Are Lakes, was one of last year's most underrated albums, a poignant showcase for singer Elizabeth Powell's bruised-peach vocals, and this fall the trio is following it up w...
09.15.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
Well, it's good see that somebody found a use for Peter, Bjorn and John's wildly uneven latest album, Living Thing. If that record arrived half-formed, then Mick Boogie's re-imagining of that record, the Re-Living Thing mixtape�available for free download on an Internet near you)�marks its completion. As underground producers like 6th Sense and Cookin' Soul give Peter, Bjorn and John's clattery ...
09.08.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
Full disclosure: I don�t much care for M. Ward. I find his songwriting nearly as dull as his listless, smug voice, and I find his invocation of vintage American music to be disingenuous, just another affect he slathers over his flimsy songs. I admit this now not to rip on a performer I�ve mostly held my tongue about for the past half decade, but to give context to my endorsement of the debu...
09.04.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
Official streams of Raekwon's Only Built 4 Cuban Linx II went out today, and the album is every bit the swift Tim boot kick to the head Wu-Tang fans hoped it would be. It's a remarkable, beast of a record�it's 21 tracks long�and it manages what few Wu-Tang projects have this decade, taking that classic, grimy, cinematic Wu-Tang sound and making it fresh and vital again. Raekwon is on the t...
Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Argentina opens Latin-American series

In a bad marriage, children can become the one common interest holding the couple together. And in a good marriage, children are usually the focus, an organizing principle of their parents' lives. When the children leave, some couples feel disoriented and play for time as they regain their direction. And some marriages run out of time once the kids are gone. That could be the guiding theme of an intriguing film from Argentina, Empty Nest (El Nido Vacio). But director Daniel Burman smuggles other meanings into his story, including the sometimes-uncertain line between desire...
07.13.2010 | | Posted at 06:00 PM
By Evan Rytlewski
Whether Method Man and Redman's 1999 collaboration Blackout! is actually a classic is up for debate, but as the only full length from the cult rappers turned unlikely Abbott and Costello comedy team, its status grew each year to the point that any formal follow-up was bound to be a disappointment. By almost every measure, though, Meth and Red's tardy sequel, Blackout! 2, is better than its predece...
05.12.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
That The Church still have great albums in them isn't a surprise; they've already proven themselves one of the few bands unblemished by age. Each year the veteran rock band gets older, grayer, farther removed from their '80s stardom and ostensibly more out of touch with contemporary music, yet their output remains as vital as ever. But even coming on the heels of so many proud late period releases...
05.06.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Evan Rytlewski
From the "music I love immediately and intensely" file: the self-titled debut from Polly Scattergood, the latest successor to those Kate Bush comparisons that are suddenly in vogue thanks to St. Vincent and Bat For Lashes. Scattergood's debut also invites comparisons to a whole host of other moody songwriters, touching on Lily Allen's spunky pop, Lykke Li's electronic brain twisters and Joanna New...
Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2008

Not-so-classic remake

Imagine the shock: Mary is having her nails done at Saks when her babbling manicurist bumbles into a monologue on infidelity involving Crystal, the girl at the store's perfume counter, and a respected Wall Street investment broker. Before the conversation is over, Mary realizes that the broker isn't just some name from the business pages of the Times. He's Steve, her husband of 13 years.
Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2008

Classical Preview

   By 1809, (1770-1827) had become somewhat restive with the piano concerto form, tiring of its common use as a mere display piece for the soloist to show off his virtuoso skills. Thus for his next such work, he wrote no cadenza (in fact, he expressly forbade one), and instead thoroughly integrated the solo piano part into the fabric of the orchestra. Dubbed the Emperor Concerto by its admirers for its majestic sweep and broad themes, Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 5 in E-Flat Major, Op. 73, has retained its regal position within its genre for the past 200 years. More than...
Wednesday, July 30, 2008

Classical Review

In an era of young classical titans, whose performances had a wider resonance in a world that was still listening, William Kapell was a rising star. The American pianist’s ascent was cut short by a plane crash in 1953. He was only 31. The last recordings he made have been located and collected on reDiscovered (released by Sony BMG), a two-disc set culled largely from radio broadcasts during Australian tours in the summer and fall of his final year. I say “largely” because the producers of this set weren’t content to leave history alone. A missing section from a performance of Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 3 was “patched” with a recording Kapell made five . . .
Wednesday, July 30, 2008

Brideshead is back

Evelyn Waugh’s meditation on faith and its absence, and the varieties of love and desire, found a new audience in the 1980s through a British television production of Brideshead Revisited. Readers of Waugh’s novel and fans of the 11-part miniseries alike will find some of their favorite bits missing from the new film adaptation. British director Julian Jarrold should be commended, however, for intelligently condensing an emotionally rich story spanning two decades into a two-hour movie. Some of my favorite lines were edited, it’s true, but the main themes and memorable scenes for the most part remain.
Wednesday, July 9, 2008

Theater Review

There’s a new kid on our theater block. Lake Geneva Theatre Company premiered with Noel Coward’s Private Lives on July 4, offering its own celebratory bang. Bright, sophisticated comedies from the 1920s and ‘30s—such as Coward’s exemplary romps—took a nosedive into oblivion post-World War Two. “Realistic” replaced “Artificial” comedies. Using the memorable performances of Tallulah Bankhead and Donald Cook in Coward’s classic as a yardstick, the theater company measures up exceedingly well—which translates: “They mostly don’t make out like they’re doing Neil Simon.”
Sunday, June 15, 2008

Robert Downey’s superhero

If you’re anything like me, you know of Iron Man from the Black Sabbath song, not the Vietnam-era comic book that inspired it. But out in the hinterlands of fandom, Iron Man remained a popular Marvel superhero, even if Hollywood never lifted him from pulp pages to the big screen. It wasn’t for lack of interest. The one-man panzer division moved from studio to studio, attracting and repelling actors and directors. After more than 10 years in development, Iron Man has finally arrived, with Robert Downey Jr. in the title role and director Jon Favreau (Elf) behind the viewfinder.
Wednesday, April 23, 2008

Architecture Review

Hollyhock House, a residence in Los Angeles that Frank Lloyd Wright designed for oil-rich heiress Aline Barnsdall in 1919, is not among the architect’s most celebrated works. Indeed, it belongs to what has been considered by some historians as a less illustrious, almost anomalistic period of his career. However, within the last decade or so, there has been a resurgence of interest in the building, culminating in an exhibit by the Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs that includes the Hollyhock House drawings in its possession as well as photographs by Edmund Teske, a friend of both Barnsdall and Wright. Through June 15, some of these drawings and photographs can be seen at Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum.
Thursday, Jan. 24, 2008

Theater Review

It is 1963. The Civil Rights Movement is in full swing. The Watsons are living in frigid Flint, Mich., hoping to make a better life in the north while escaping the economic and racial strife plaguing African-Americans in the South. Based on Reginald A. Jackson’s adaptation . . .
Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2007

The Other Side of the Mirror: Live At The Newport Folk Festival,

The folk-blues revival was a lively movement of rediscovery. It ran circa the early-1960s through Bob Dylan's death-knell summer of '65 performance captured on this DVD.
Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2007

Santa's Playlist (Rock Ridge Music)

Every year, it seems like the artists who are least likely to release a holiday record are the ones who do exactly that (Twisted Sister, anyone?). And now you can add veteran acoustic jangle-rockers Sister Hazel to that list.
Thursday, Nov. 22, 2007

A. Chavez - Milwaukee

Hamlet Deserved a Serious Review I was beyond disappointed to read Amie Segal’s immature and poorly written review of Milwaukee Ballet’s Hamlet (“Hamlet Abridged,” Nov. 8).

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