Home / Tag: Shank Hall
Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2008
When he lived in Milwaukee, guitarist Jason Seed was often thought of as a jazz musician, probably because he was often seen at the Estate club on the city's East Side. But one listen to his music and any one label begins to sound tiny, incapable of encompassing the sonic space Seed inhabits. "So, basically, genre be damned," says Seed, who now mostly splits his time between Chicago and Austin but returns to Milwaukee periodically to gig and record. He calls his music "rockdixiefunkinjazzgypsyclassicadelitango" and that only begins to describe . . .
Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2008

Tonight @ Shank Hall - 8 p.m.

After distinguished stints backing blues greats John Mayall and Albert Collins, guitarist Coco Montoya finally took a stab at his own solo career in 1995, and he’s been recording steadily ever since. Though he cut his teeth with sharp, electric riffs, on recent records he’s fall into a softer, more soulful sound a la Robert . . .
Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2008

Tonight @ Shank Hall - 8 p.m.

Don’t confuse the Minneapolis all-girl pop-punk outfit Sick of Sarah with The Donnas. Sick of Sarah rarely confines themselves solely to punk conventions, instead opting for periodic slowdowns where lead singer Abisha Uhl’s Yeah Yeah Yeahs-esque jaded flatness really shines past the sugary dead-ends of similarly . . .
Sunday, Aug. 10, 2008

Tonight @ Shank Hall - 8 p.m.

Some time around Thanksgiving, The Supersuckers will celebrate their 20th anniversary as punk's answer to hedonistic, cowboy-hat wearing, meat-and-potatoes American rock 'n' roll. Twenty years is long enough for the band, born in Tucson, Ariz., to have moved to Seattle before the grunge movement took full steam . . .
Friday, Aug. 1, 2008

This Week in Milwaukee

Thursday, July 31, CSS w/ The Go! Team and Matt & Kim @ Turner Hall Ballroom, 8 p.m. Hailing from Sao Paulo and sounding like a self-aware, electro-chic version of Avril Lavigne with a playfully dry sense of humor, CSS seemingly survived the pitfalls of a cutesy beginning in iPod Touch commercials...
Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2008
Mike Mangione wanted out of his comfort zone. That's why he left Milwaukee-his home for almost four years now-and spent two weeks in early 2007 living in a hotel in Lexington, Ky. At nearby Shangri-la Productions, he recorded Tenebrae, a stirring, brutally personal and critically acclaimed record that takes emotional cues from such albums as Peter Gabriel's Us and Bob Dylan's Time Out of Mind.
Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2008
The Supersuckers are the greatest rock 'n' roll band in the world. It says so right on their Web site. And album covers. And merchandise. "At least 25% better than the next best band," says Rontrose, the band's one-named guitar player, tongue firmly in cheek. Some time around Thanksgiving, Rontrose and crew will celebrate their 20th anniversary as punk's answer to hedonistic, cowboy-hat wearing, meat-and-potatoes American rock 'n' roll. Twenty years is long enough for the band, born in Tucson, Ariz., to have moved to Seattle before the grunge movement took full steam . . .
Friday, Aug. 1, 2008

Tonight @ Shank Hall - 8 p.m.

Arriving hot on the heels the ’90s hard-edged grunge movement, the music of Michigan’s Tiles nod to the days when Alice In Chains and Living Colour put a disguised, proggy spin on modern rock. Though retaining the era’s signature simple, no-nonsense fuzz riffs, Tiles makes a point of branching into far too . . .
Wednesday, July 23, 2008
A cautious optimism has permeated Milwaukee’s once demoralized music scene. As local bands—through a mix of talent, vision and, perhaps most importantly, strategic self-promotion—begin to make a name for themselves and as radio stations and print publications make a more visible effort to cover the local scene, there’s an increasing sense that Milwaukee musicians may now actually have a shot at national exposure. That feeling is certainly driving The Heavyheads.
Wednesday, July 23, 2008

Tonight @ Shank Hall - 8 p.m.

Through workman like persistence, Walter Trout over the decades has worked his way up from being a side-player to an increasingly prominent roster of musicians—including Joe Tex, Canned Heat, John Lee Hooker and John Mayall—to become a headliner with his own band, Walter Trout and the Radicals, who do . . .

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