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09.01.2008 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Joe Uchill
Prime Minister Vladimir Putin saved a Russian camera crew from a Siberian tiger attack yesterday. Sorta makes up for killing that dissident journalist the day before....
08.31.2008 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Joe Uchill
Russia is a scary place. Two days ago, Magomed Yevloyev, owner of a news site critical of Russia’s handling of the Ingushetiya region, was fatally shot in the temple while detained by police. The police have confirmed that the proprietor of www.ingushetiya.com was killed by a bullet from an officer's gun while he was being driven into custody – and have claimed it to be an accident. Reuter...
Monday, July 21, 2008
To fall into the clutches of the Soviet Union’s system of arrest, imprisonment and torture was infamously easy for Americans who entered the nation from the 1930s to the 1950s. To get out was well-nigh impossible—short of death—and little help was to be found from U.
Tuesday, July 15, 2008

Forsaken Americans swallowed by cruel Soviet system

To fall into the clutches of the Soviet Union’s system of arrest, imprisonment and torture was infamously easy for Americans who entered the nation from the 1930s to the 1950s. To get out was well-nigh impossible—short of death—and little help was to be found from U.S. authorities. In The Forsaken: An American Tragedy in Stalin’s Russia (Penguin Press), Tim Tzouliadis, a documentary filmmaker born in Greece but educated and living in Britain, has written a book to raise the ire of decent people everywhere. The outrages and horrors recounted in the book, buttressed by bristling documentation, overcome any shortcomings of its workmanlike writing style . . .
Wednesday, March 5, 2008

(University of Wisconsin), edited by Marcus C. Levitt and Tatyan

Violence has been inseparable from the human condition, so why pick on Russia? The editors of this collection of scholarly essays fail to make their case, but that doesn’t mean that many of the book’s articles aren’t worth reading. Violence is a broad theme and the contributors to Times of Trouble explore the subject along many avenues. Among the most interesting topics are women writers who survived the Gulag, psychological violence in Dostoyevsky, the curmudgeonly and skeptical late-Soviet novelist Viktor Astaf’ev and an astute psychological examination of Stalinism whose conclusion is that Stalin and his henchmen feared the Russian people as much as the people feared them.

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