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Monday, Aug. 20, 2012
Meet Tom Hartwig, an 80-something farmer in small-town Wisconsin whose favorite hobby is firing his homemade cannons. Hartwig is at the center of Michael Perry's touching memoir, Visiting Tom: A Man, a Highway, and the Road to Roughneck...
Tuesday, April 24, 2012
More than 15 artists have created works based on the literary writings of Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986) for the sublime “Painting Borges: Art Interpreting Literature.” The exhibition opens April 30 at Latino Arts Inc. in the United Community...
08.05.2010 | | Posted at 12:18 PM

From the Hayden's Ferry Review

By Ken Brosky
I've been reading my issues of the Missouri Review and One Story and loving every single issue, but that isn't why I've been so busy. You see, I think August is going to be one of those months where I'm going to get something published. Inundation. War by Attrition. Not only that, I just received my MFA from the University of Nebraska-Omaha, so that was taking up a lot of my time, too. But I'm ...
05.03.2010 | | Posted at 12:41 PM

By Tony Press, from the Foundling Review

By Ken Brosky
I think I've left the interview with Ethan Rutherford up long enough (and I hope you checked it out, especially if you're an aspiring writer ... great stuff!). I spent a few hours last week browsing through some new lit mags that I never heard of before and bookmarked all of them to add to my massive collection titled, aptly, "Things You need to read." The "You" refers to me, an the rhyme was pure...
03.18.2010 | | Posted at 12:20 PM

Published in Hayden's Ferry Review

By Ken Brosky
I found this creepy, well-written story a week ago and put off sharing it because of certain MFA-related obligations. But now that I've got time, I thought I'd better get this out to you guys. From "Dredge," by Matt Bell: � In the garage, he lifts the lid of the chest freezer that sits against the far wall. He stares at the open space above the paper-wrapped bundles of venison, tries ...
02.03.2010 | | Posted at 10:15 PM

By Dawn Allen

By Ken Brosky
Thought I'd share a short story by Dawn Allen, whom I just so happen to know and can vouch for. Not sure why I'd ever have to vouch for her, since all you need to do is read her stuff to know she's got talent. This is a short story from A Fly in Amber, an online fiction zine that has a really nice, easy-to-navigate blog-looking layout. From her story Branded in Gray:     Prison...
12.31.1969 | | Posted at 06:00 PM

From the Adirondack Review

By Ken Brosky
Sometimes, I happen upon new fiction purely out of luck. In this case, I was double-checking my SPAM folder and noticed that for some reason, my mail system was dropping emails from Black Lawrence Press there instead of my Inbox. May that be lesson to you: keep an eye on that SPAM folder. Or don't. I don't care, really.  Here's a snippet of "The Average Human Heart" by Martin Law: ��I ...
12.31.1969 | | Posted at 06:00 PM

"Miss November" featured on American Short Fiction

By Ken Brosky
It's nice to occasionally read something that doesn't follow the traditional pattern for "story." That isn't to say seeing new and different approaches to fiction is always exciting, though, but sometimes a writer comes along with a special knack for tossing style on its head and really comes out a winner. From "Arizona," by Rachel Khong: �1. Where...
12.31.1969 | | Posted at 06:00 PM

With fiction by Ashley Kaine

By Ken Brosky
I've taken a break from damaging my brain with copious amounts of Dragon Age to check out the progress of Cream City Review's new Web site, and it's looking fantastic. Easy to browse, lots of features and teasers for the issues, and a built-in blog with updates and other features that take advantage of the internet (like video, for instance!). Cream City Review is published by the creative writ...
12.31.1969 | | Posted at 06:00 PM

Read Melville's best short story for free

By Ken Brosky
I'm in the process of trudging through Moby-Dick, purely for the enjoyment of it (and yes, it turns out the story is quite enjoyable!), and I'm glad to see that Melville's signature writing style is at the forefront in this novel. My first experience with Melville was his short story "Bartleby the Scrivener," which surprised me at just how readable it really was. In fact, I'd say it's one of ...

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