Home / Tag: batman
Monday, July 15, 2013

The villains under the black hats

 In Chuck Klosterman’s new book I Wear the Black Hat: Grappling with Villains (Real and Imagined), he returns with
Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2014
 You gotta have art. But don’t take it from me. No less than one of the area’s most prolific art spaces, the Cedarburg Cultural Center (W62 N546 Washington Ave.), declares as much in the title of their fast-approaching juried exhibition and fundraising art sale: “You Gotta Have Art
Monday, July 23, 2012

Questions remain at end of Nolan's Batman trilogy

The best superhero comics have always dressed moral, political and social...
Wednesday, July 23, 2008

Heath Ledger’s Gotham Nights

Life overtook art in January with the death of Heath Ledger, the Joker in The Dark Knight. Ledger was one of Hollywood’s rising actors and his role as the supervillain in the much-anticipated sequel to Batman Begins would cinch his stardom. Dead or alive, Ledger was destined to dominate The Dark Knight. An unspoken rule is in effect: The bad guys tend to get the best lines in Hollywood; they are usually more flamboyant than their opponents, more intriguing and mysterious. Poor Christian Bale never has a chance. As Batman (or “the Batman” as he’s often called in a nod to the earliest comic strips), he is left to brood . . .
Monday, July 21, 2008
Poor Christian Bale never has a chance. As Batman (or “the Batman” as he’s often called in a nod to the earliest comic strips), he is left to brood heavily under his kinky black leather mask. The screen belongs to Ledger’s Joker, even if the streets of Gotham are up for grabs.
07.21.2008 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By David Luhrssen
Heath Ledger proved bigger in death than he was in life during the opening weekend of The Dark Knight, with three-day ticket sales breaking record at $155.3 million. It was especially tragic because, with the strength of Ledger's unforgettable performance as the Joker coupled with the ordinary hype associated a summer blockbuster sequel, Dark Knight would have done almost as well if he had lived ...
Wednesday, July 16, 2008

Remembering TV’s Caped Crusader

“Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear...” No, I’m not referring to the legendary “Lone Ranger” radio show of the 1940s and early ’50s, I’m talking about the twice-weekly “Batman” series on late-afternoon and primetime television in the late 1960s. It was high camp played to perfection—stunningly creative and outrageously funny. The hilarious simplicity of TV’s Adam West (Batman), Burt Ward (Robin) and a gaggle of veteran supporting thespians, trumps the foreboding vision and craven villains in Hollywood’s big star “Batman” films of the last few decades.

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