Home / Tag: Skylight opera
Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2011
The Skylight Opera Theatre's elaborately staged, exhilarating production of The Music Man is a joyous, nostalgic reminder of the kind of show that used to define the Broadway musical stage. But time can take its toll even with the most fondly...
Wednesday, May 18, 2011

Theater Preview

Elmer Rice's 1923 play The Adding Machine would appear to be ahead of its time. The story of a man named Zero working in an office for a large, faceless corporation certainly sounds more contemporary than one might expect for a story that pre-dates the push-button telephone...
Wednesday, May 12, 2010
Jonathan Larson’s Rent may be the 1990s’ biggest contribution to musical theater, but it remains an odd mixture. It’s Puccini’s La Boheme by way of raw, grunge-inspired rock transmitted into a highly polished musical-theater vehicle that is...
12.31.1969 | | Posted at 06:00 PM

The Cabots Will Be Joined by Guest Artists from the Skylight’s 50 Year History

By Russ Bickerstaff
Colin and Paula Cabot, whose new Skylight show opens this New Year’s Eve, will be joined 14 different guest artists from the Skylight’s half-century history. The guest artists joining the Cabots for The Long and the Short Of It have recently been announced. They include: Elaine Parsons-Herro, Ray Jivoff, Mark-David Kaplan, Pam Kriger, Kathy Magestro, Norman Moses, Kurt Ollmann, Ellie Quint, ...
09.03.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Russ Bickerstaff
  My wife and I arrived at the Broadway Theatre Center for the Skylight Opera’s season-opening open house. After a quick stroll through the scene shop and the stage area, we were on to the basement. The BasementThe area beneath the Broadway Theatre’s main stage is a small maze of communal dressing rooms, other assorted rooms and a rather cozy-looking green room. There’s nothing that ...
09.02.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Russ Bickerstaff
Noel and the Plant My wife and I arrived at the Broadway Theatre Center and promptly spotted a woman named Noel standing next to a large potted plant. It was the Skylight Opera’s open house.  The Skylight has been around for 50 years. It opened its doors last night to celebrate the occasion. Noel was a rather short woman in a red dress standing next to a rather large potted plant. Noel is th...
08.21.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Russ Bickerstaff
The Skylight Opera Theatre announced yesterday that Off The Wall Theatre’s Dale Gutzman will be directing a late-season show with them. Written and directed by Gutzman, An Evening With Gilbert and Sullivan will run May 28th through June 20th of next year. Gutzman had worked extensively with the Skylight in the ‘70’s and ‘80’s, Directing 23 shows with them in that time. In the press rele...
07.31.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Russ Bickerstaff
The thought of a large group of people getting together in a major downtown theatre venue to sing along with Grease is a bit disturbing to me. I’m not even sure why. Prior to things getting complicated, tonight and tomorrow night, The Skylight Opera Theatre was planning on presenting the next in its series of cinematic sing alongs in the spacious Cabot Theatre of the Broadway Theatre complex...
04.05.2009 | | Posted at 12:00 AM
By Russ Bickerstaff
Manifesting in boxy multiplexes all over the country, modern cinema bears little resemblance to the  classy experience of going to a film in the movie palaces of the golden age of cinema. (At least, I assume it was--the first film I ever saw was Empire Strikes Back in a multiplex in 1980.) Even a trip to the Oriental on the East Side feels a bit faded to what it must have been like for Milwaukeea...
Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008

Classical Review

A friend said to me recently, “I have tickets to La bohme at the Skylight, but after their La traviata last season, I’m not sure I want to go.” For anyone else with concerns about standard opera repertory at the Skylight, be assured that the new production of La bohme, which opened last weekend, is not a wild re-conception of the musical score or libretto to Puccini’s opera. Director Bill Theisen, artistic director at the Skylight, placed the opera in 1930s Paris rather than the1830s, a gentle change . . .

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