Home / Tag: Ludwig van Beethoven
Monday, Jan. 21, 2013

Philomusica Plays Haydn, Glass and Beethoven

Presenting a selection that spans more than two centuries of string quartet literature, Milwaukee’s Philomusica Quartet will take its audience on a tour full of musical humor, incandescence and elegance. Haydn’s charming and
Wednesday, April 15, 2009

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By his middle years as a composer (often dubbed his "Heroic Period"), Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) had found his own voice to the extent that he was no longer considered a mere extension of Mozart and Haydn. In 1808 he produced two groundbreaking symphonies (the Fifth and Sixth), as well as a set of piano trios (Op. 70), that represent a return to the intimacy of chamber music that Beethoven had set aside for grander forms. Of the Piano Trio in E-Flat Major, Op. 70, No. 2, noted scholar...
Monday, Dec. 22, 2008

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Though some rudimentary sketches for a Tenth Symphony were eventually found among his belongings, it is hard to imagine where Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) could have taken the symphonic genre after the completion of his D Minor Symphony-a work written a dozen years after his Seventh and Eighth Symphonies and a fitting culmination of Beethoven's symphonic output. Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125 has been called the "Choral Symphony," but that is misleading and a mistake in emphasis, undervaluing the three purely orchestral movements that precede the choral finale. But the title (which was not Beethoven's) understandably...
Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2008

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   By 1809, (1770-1827) had become somewhat restive with the piano concerto form, tiring of its common use as a mere display piece for the soloist to show off his virtuoso skills. Thus for his next such work, he wrote no cadenza (in fact, he expressly forbade one), and instead thoroughly integrated the solo piano part into the fabric of the orchestra. Dubbed the Emperor Concerto by its admirers for its majestic sweep and broad themes, Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 5 in E-Flat Major, Op. 73, has retained its regal position within its genre for the past 200 years. More than...
Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2008

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Is he also nothing but a human being? He will…become a tyrant.” So fumed Ludwig van Beethoven (1770- 1827) upon first hearing that Napoleon Bonaparte had crowned himself Emperor of France. No doubt Beethoven felt Napoleon had . . .

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