Home / Tag: Johann Sebastian Bach
Monday, May 6, 2013

Ensemble Musical Offering performs Telemann, Bach

 While the lives of Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767) and Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) were not closely intertwined, they did intersect in more than just a casual manner. Of immediate interest is the upcoming
Tuesday, July 1, 2008
Johann Sebastian Bach was no idle dilettante, penning music here and there when the elusive muse whispered in his ear. As cantor at Leipzig’s Thomas School, he was part of the state-supervised Lutheran Church bureaucracy of 18th-century Germany; his gifts as a composer were given form by the steady regimen of his official responsibilities...
Sunday, June 1, 2008

Today @ the Marcus Center - 2:30 p.m.

Munich-born guest conductor Jun Markl oversees the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra’s latest program, From Germany to Russia, which features violinist Hilary Hahn. The program kicks off with a timely performance of Schumann’s Symphony No. 1 in B-flat major, “Spring,” and concludes with Tchaikovsky’s striking . . .
Tuesday, May 27, 2008

Classical Review

The Mass in B minor by Johann Sebastian Bach is one of the marvels of musical accomplishments. Its composer seemed to believe that God is, among other attributes, the ultimate intellect. This music achieves its exaltation through rigorous depth, exploring the expansion of every Baroque musical form and compositional device. The Mass in B Minor, performed by Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra last weekend, is a mountain Andreas Delfs obviously wanted to climb with the orchestra and chorus. It was an inspired journey. There are certain trade-offs that are givens when a traditional symphony orchestra and chorus present a major Baroque work such as this.
Friday, May 23, 2008

Tonight @ the Marcus Center - 8 p.m.

When Johann Sebastian Bach set himself to work on a new composition, it was normally just a matter of days, at most a week or two, before it was finished. Such was certainly not the case with his Mass in B Minor, BWV 232. The fourth part (Sanctus) dates from 1724; the first two parts (Kyrie and Gloria) were completed . . .
Tuesday, May 20, 2008

Classical Preview

When Johann Sebastian Bach set himself to work on a new composition, it was normally just a matter of days, at most a week or two, before it was finished. Such was certainly not the case with his Mass in B Minor, BWV 232. The fourth part (Sanctus) dates from 1724; the first two parts (Kyrie and Gloria) were completed in 1733; the third part (Credo), as well as the work’s final autograph score, date from 1748, just two years before . . .

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