Home / Tag: Endgame
Thursday, April 10, 2008

Tonight @ the Milwaukee Repertory Theater - 7:30 PM

In typical Samuel Beckett fashion, very little happens in the one-act play Endgame. Two characters, one who cannot stand up and another who cannot sit down, bicker back and forth in a small house, with no indication that there is any remaining life whatsoever outside. Is the play a character study or Beckett’s interpretation . . .
Wednesday, March 26, 2008

Theater Reviews

You’re on Earth, there’s no cure for that,” bellows Michael Corkins, playing Hamm in Milwaukee Rep’s production of Endgame. His outburst marks one of many instances when his rich stentorian voice erupts into violent disdain for the futility and wretchedness of human existence. Despite the comic patter consistent throughout the play, this expression of despair for the irremediable suffering of mankind clings to the characters like the fog one imagines inhabits the world outside their decaying cocoon. Prolonged disease and decrepitude remain within; “Outside of here it’s death.”
Tuesday, March 25, 2008

Tonight @ the Milwaukee Repertory Theater - 7:30 PM

In typical Samuel Beckett fashion, very little happens in the one act play Endgame. Two characters, one who cannot stand up and another who cannot sit down, bicker back and forth in a small house, with no indication that there is any remaining life whatsoever outside. Is the play a character study of Beckett’s interpretation . . .
Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Theater Preview

Four people, two ash bins and a toy dog may not seem like much come the end of time, but these components have propelled Samuel Beckett’s Endgame to more than 50 years of critical praise. Starting next weekend, the Stiemke Theater brings Endgame back to Milwaukee. When the sheet is pulled off Mark Corkins on March 21, it will be his second time in the role of the blind, sickly Hamm. Years ago, Corkins played Hamm in the tiny confines of the UW-Milwaukee Studio Theatre. With its larger stage, the Milwaukee Rep has a much bigger canvas to work with. On the flip side, however, the Rep will face difficulty in bringing the immediacy of the characters’ emotional realities to one of the largest studio theaters in the county. As seen before at UWM, the perpetually restless decay of Hamm’s sickness breathes a fascinating counterpoint through Corkins’ powerful, deeply resonant voice. Lee Ernst will fill the role of Clov, the reluctant servant who comes ever closer to leaving the dying Hamm. Without Clov’s aid, Hamm would be left helpless, thus unraveling the tension that holds the play together. .

0|1