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Wednesday, July 16, 2008

Dance Review

Rebecca Stenn will bring her New York dance company to Milwaukee later this week for performances at Danceworks. A graduate of the UW-Milwaukee Masters Dance Program and a Juliard-trained choreographer, she deals with the themes of home and sense of place, exploring the effects of the strings that tie us to our place of origin. Stenn’s ties to Wisconsin include several works that were created here, including Blue Print Redux, which will comprise the bulk of the Danceworks performance. The initial idea for the evening-length piece was hatched during Stenn’s company’s residency last year at Sheboygan’s Kohler Arts Center. . .
Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008

Dance Review

In the midst of this winter of our discontent the Milwaukee Ballet’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream conjures up a magical world filled with fairies and mortals and the expressive freedom of summer—at least onstage. Based on Bruce Wells’ choreography with Felix Mendelssohn’s score, this Midsummer condenses Shakespeare’s play to one hour, 45 minutes (with intermission) while still keeping intact the storyline of three couples bewitched by magic potions and mistaken identities, all under the mischievous doings of the spritely Puck, whose devilish horns serve him well. The dreamlike atmosphere is all the more pronounced as Wells has set the entire dance in the forest of Oberon and Titania, the fairy king and queen.
Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008

Dance Review

In the midst of this winter of our discontent the Milwaukee Ballet’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream conjures up a magical world filled with fairies and mortals and the expressive freedom of summer—at least onstage. Based on Bruce Wells’ choreography with Felix Mendelssohn’s score, this Midsummer condenses Shakespeare’s play to one hour, 45 minutes (with intermission) while still keeping intact the storyline of three couples bewitched by magic potions and mistaken identities, all under the mischievous doings of the spritely Puck, whose devilish horns serve him well. The dreamlike atmosphere is all the more pronounced as Wells has set the entire dance in the forest of Oberon and Titania, the fairy king and queen.

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