Home / Tag: Crime and Punishment
Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Going inside the mind of a murderer

In addition to himself, the mind of Raskolnikov (Matt Schwader) is occupied by six other characters in American Players Theatre's production of Crime and Punishment: his mother Pulcheria Alexandrovna, the detective Porfiry, the reluctant prostitute Sonya and her drunken father Marmeladov, and the parasitic...
Friday, Feb. 29, 2008

Tonight @ the Broadway Theatre Center - 8:00 PM

The Milwaukee Chamber Theatre is celebrating the leap-year tonight with a pair of parties before and after tonight’s 8 p.m. performance of their lean-and-mean, 90-minute take on Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment. Ticket holders can go across the street to Cuvee for a 6 p.m. reception with Crime . . .
Saturday, Feb. 23, 2008

Tonight @ the Broadway Theatre Center - 4:00 & 8:00 PM

The Milwaukee Chamber Theatre continues its pared-down production of Crime and Punishment today with 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. performances at the Broadway Theatre Center. Marilyn Campbell and Curt Columbus have distilled Dostoyevsky’s lengthy masterpiece into a tight, 90-minute, three-actor play . . .
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2008

Theater Reviews

Milwaukee Chamber Theatre’s production of Crime and Punishment invites audiences to enter the mind of a murderer. It’s a cramped and tawdry place. Oddly angled walls painted a bilious green seem to close in on you; disembodied sounds emanate from the background and doors swoosh open and shut, marking phantomlike entrances and offering glimpses of a diaphanous limbo in which the protagonist’s fearsome existence appears to be couched. Rarely does stagecraft, sound and lighting play such a significant role as it does here in this pareddown production.
Thursday, Feb. 21, 2008

Tonight @ the Broadway Theatre Center - 7:30 PM

The Milwaukee Chamber Theatre continues its pared-down production of Crime and Punishment tonight with a 7:30 p.m. performance at the Broadway Theatre Center. Marilyn Campbell and Curt Columbus have distilled Dostoyevsky’s lengthy masterpiece into a tight, 90-minute, three-actor play focusing mainly . . .

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