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Art
Wednesday, July 9, 2008

Art Review

When an artist is successful, the assembled whole is greater than the sum of its parts. When a curator is successful, the whole is not necessarily greater, but creates tension and visual dialogue among artists seeing the same formal element in different ways. At Katie Gingrass Gallery, pastel artist Jody dePew McLeane and wood sculptor Joel Hunnicutt use the classical corpulence of the empty vessel—perhaps the world's oldest and most universally functional art form—to create “Relative Spaces.”
Concert Reviews
Wednesday, June 25, 2008

Saturday, June 21, 2008

A battalion of atavistic bands are raising the specter of psychedelic music, painting it black with plural nouns evocative of the netherworld. Saturday night's show at Mad Planet billed two such chthonic acts as bookends with a curious bolt of Call Me Lightning in the center. Promoting their fifth album, Heavy Deavy Skull Lover, The Warlocks performed with a skeleton crew half the size of their original lineup. Despite attenuated personnel and an unfortunate opening slot on a three’s-a-crowd bill, The Warlocks filled the space with brooding, elegiac new material.
Art
Tuesday, May 27, 2008

Art Review

When photography's advent eclipsed pen and ink as a means of reproduction, the city—representations of which dotted the landscape of art history for centuries—became a symbol of modernity, most famously with Atget's photographs of fin-de-sicle Paris. In Gingrass Gallery's “Urban Perspectives” show, a group of artists use the city, its essence and architecture, as a point of departure for myriad ways of interpreting the natural habitat of industry and contemporary Western culture. The harsh angularity of the modern city attests to a human mastery of engineering; of man's struggle to impose civilized geometry upon nature's organic sinuosity.
Concert Reviews
Tuesday, May 20, 2008

Monday, May 12, 2008

There's nothing quite so deliciously satisfying to one's ironic sensibility than witnessing the "majority" cheer for the videotaped speechifying of Kouichi Touyama, a street musician who ran for governor of Tokyo in 2007.
Art
Wednesday, May 7, 2008

Art Review

A collaborative performance and mixed media installation at UWM's Union Art Gallery, “Implosion: Cultural Integration and Transformation,” attempts to draw a through-line among disparate cultures using the lightning rod of religious iconography. Rather than focusing on Abrahamic, monotheistic religious expressions, artists Leandro Soto, Raoul Deal, and Ren Maldonado, in collaboration with Nigerian dramatist Awam Amkpa, ask viewers to consider the feminine roots of polytheism.
Concert Reviews
Tuesday, April 29, 2008

Saturday, April 26 @ The Cactus Club

As many critics noted upon the release of Seattle band The Cave Singers’ debut album, the band members’ musical pedigrees suggest they’d be unlikely to attempt—much less succeed at—acoustic American roots music. Nonetheless, guitarist Derek Fudesco (of the now disbanded Pretty Girls Make Graves), vocalist Pete Quirk (of post-punk quintet Hint Hint) and drummer Marty Lund (of Cobra High) released their acclaimed Invitation Songs in September 2007.
Concert Reviews
Wednesday, March 26, 2008

March 18, 2008

In October 2005, while Swedish-born Jos Gonzlez rode the ripples from the abrupt wave of international acclaim given to his 2003 album, Veneer, in the wake of its U.S. release, I watched an unaccompanied Mia Doi Todd face the impatient, hirsute horde that had amassed for a late-night show at The Independent in San Francisco. Todd was illmatched as the opener for another Scandinavian . . .
Art
Sunday, March 23, 2008

Art Review

If Walker Evans' document of tenant farmers in 1930s Alabama were stripped of its human element, the residue might resemble jw lawson's "Southeastern View," a series of photographs made by the Milwaukee-based artist and gallery owner over the past seven years on sojourns home to his native Tennessee. In lawson's second solo exhibition at his eponymous gallery, he excavates the ruins below the Rust Belt to uncover contemporary artifacts otherwise imperceptible to interstate tourists traveling along prescribed four-lane routes through the South.

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