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A&E Feature
Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008

The films of Nathaniel Dorsky

Since the mid-1960s, Nathaniel Dorsky has made meditative films that reside in a quiet hermitage outside the camp of the avant-garde auteur. They attempt to eradicate the dominance of first-person perspective. "There is something immoral about it for me," he says. "If I'm going to have people trapped in a dark room looking at a screen, it's kind of a dangerous, powerful position. I don't want them to see me. I want to offer something which enriches them." Dorsky's films are an antidote to cinema's tendency toward hyperbole and overstimulation. Where most avant-garde films are variations on the endurance test (Warhol), an onslaught of seizure-inducing visual contrast (the flicker film) or the discordant...
Art
Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2008

Art Review

Video and video installation artists occupy the hazy gray zone between cinema, sculpture and performance art. By virtue of the medium's immediacy, accessibility and historically cheap aesthetics, video artists are saddled with the task of clearly defining their work outside the realm of mainstream and even avant-garde cinema. According to the show's curator, Andrea Inselmann, the video artists of "Stop. Look. Listen." explore three types of relationships: artist to mainstream cinema, sound to image, and the mirror relationship between the viewer and the body as subject. And while these themes...
Concert Reviews
Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2008

Oct. 10, 2008

   Seattle's folk-rock quintet Fleet Foxes deserve all the critical praise and superlatives lavished on them in the short time since the June release of their self-titled debut album. As has been the case for many stops on their tour, the b...
Off the Cuff
Thursday, Oct. 2, 2008
Peace advocate, poet and former educator and nurse Amy Stonemark is quick to draw a distinction between liberals and radicals, and counts herself among the latter. Stonemark has a long history of peaceful protest, marching for civil rights with Martin Luther King in Selma, Ala., and once had the rap sheet to prove it.
Concert Reviews
Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2008

Sept. 22, 2008

   A pair of guitarists and sometime percussionists who combine heavy sampling and live instruments to create a hybrid form that is solely instrumental, Ratatat's Evan Mast and Mike Stroud make music that is infectiously danceable, and most...
Concert Reviews
Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2008

Sept. 18, 2008

From their inception, the Detroit Cobras were better than the average soul and R&B cover band. In addition to playing other artists' music, they've performed a public service by digging deep into the back catalogs of '60s soul labels like Minit and Stax to unearth and revisit forgotten classics, introducing them to newer generations of audiences. During the past decade, the Cobras have weathered a revolving door of personnel changes in the rhythm section, with lead singer Rachel Nagy and guitarist Maribel Restrepo remaining at the core of the lineup...
Art
Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2008

Art Review

Joseph Sinness' cross-hatched pileups of vegetation, bouquets of felines and swaths of lace converge with Erika Olson's cascades of organic material to reinterpret the pastoral and the prosaic in "Garden Variety," the Armoury Gallery's fourth exhibition. Olson's gouache and graphite works on paper conflate the palette and restraint of Suzuki Harunobu's feminine woodcuts with the sensitive, stylized surfaces characteristic of Ert’s fashion illustrations.
Art
Saturday, Aug. 30, 2008

Art Review

To paraphrase Chicago's adopted art star and provocateur Jeff Koons, if his work doesn't reach viewers through the intellect, it'll grab them by the genitals. At the very least, the Museum of Contemporary Art's comprehensive survey of the artist's iconic sculptural works, new paintings and companion exhibit, "Everything's Here: Jeff Koons and his experience of Chicago," engage the viewer in myriad ways, not all of them prurient.
Concert Reviews
Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2008

Tuesday, August 5, 2008

In pigtails and a prim frock at the Miramar Theatre last Tuesday night, with her childlike façade pianist and singer-songwriter Vienna Teng belied a lyrical maturity and vast musical range that shifted from chamber pop to soul and jazz, spliced with bits of wit and candor. Channeling the canny ease of a nightclub's resident crooner, she encouraged audience participation, solicited requests and graciously played them all . . .
Art
Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2008

Art Review

At the start of the period in which the work in "Biographical Landscape: The Photography of Stephen Shore, 1969-1979" was shot, America remained entrenched in the Vietnam War; the tumult of 1968, its assassinations and aftershocks preoccupied the country's consciousness. None of this political upheaval, however, is apparent on the main streets of small towns across the United States that populate the core of the exhibition at the Haggerty Museum of Art, on display through Sept. 28. Shore'sUncommon Places is a series of vernacular images geographically distinguishable only by the titles describing their coordinates in an intersection of time and place.

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