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Art
Monday, July 13, 2009

Art Review

In an era fraught with inconvenient truths, the art world offers little comfort in the form of giant stainless-steel balloon animals, or sharks suspended in formaldehyde. Revisiting site-specific earthworks, like those of Milwaukee-based artist Roy Staab, feels especially relevant. "Roy Staab: Four Seasons/Four Corners"at Inova/Kenilworth brings together more than 30 years' worth of the artist's work,comprising drawings, photographs, a series of video clips and two site-specific installations...
Cover Story
Wednesday, July 8, 2009

Milwaukee Festival Favorite Offers Wine, Cheese, Music and More

On July 14, 1789, violence broke out in France when overtaxed, angry Parisians stormed the Bastille prison. It was a symbolic and bloody start to the French Revolution, a tumultuous conflict of class warfare between the rising bourgeoisie and the established nobility punctuated by the...
Books
Tuesday, July 7, 2009

Book Preview

Like Joseph Conrad and Vladimir Nabokov, two novelists lauded for their success in adopting English as a second language and adding to its literary canon, Aleksandar Hemon outstrips most writers for whom English is the native tongue. Though his prose is not as fervid or rigorous as the Russian forebear, Hemon mines his adopted language for dusty gems, requiring the average reader (this one not excepted) to keep a dictionary...
Books
Tuesday, June 30, 2009

Book Preview

As the lengthy title of his second book would suggest, Les Leopold, author of The Looting of America: How Wall Street's Game of Fantasy Finance Destroyed Our Jobs, Pensions, and Prosperity and What We Can Do About It, aims to do two things: describe the financial collapse of 2008 in plain terms, and provide a road...
Art
Monday, June 15, 2009

Art Review

With its sometimes humorous, often painful and always poignant reminders of the awkward cusp of adulthood, Dawoud Bey's "Class Pictures" at the Milwaukee Art Museum offers a glimpse into the lives of 40 high-school students from across the country, photographed between 2003 and 2006. Each is presented...
Art
Tuesday, May 5, 2009

Art Review

The work of Washington, D.C.-based performance and video artist Jefferson Pinder, featured at Inova/Kenilworth through mid-June, is a study of race through metaphorical opposites: figures in motion against backgrounds in stasis; dark in the context of lightness; black in the context of whiteness. Even when Pinder's videos are in color, he often exploits the camera's ability to overexpose and blow...
Concert Reviews
Wednesday, April 8, 2009

April 1, 2009

It's a rare occurrence indeed to stumble upon a band that has garnered lavish critical praise in its adopted hometown and has more than provincial appeal. San Francisco's psyched-up and -out sextet Sleepy Sun, despite an all-too-brief set and an unhe...
Art
Monday, March 23, 2009

Art Review

In the 1970s, the Pilsen neighborhood on Chicago's Lower West Side became the capital for a predominantly Mexican population. More than 30 years later, Pilsen remains a vibrant center for Mexican-American culture and art. It seems fitting then that Walker's Point, Pilsen's sister neighborhood to the north, should host two concurrent exhibitions of Pilsen-based artists, both on view at the Walker's Point Center for the Arts through...
Music Feature
Wednesday, March 11, 2009
In one incarnation or another, for the past 15 years, singer-songwriter Will Oldham has made records on his own terms. After a peripatetic period he returned to his native Louisville, Ky., making a conscious decision to live far from the major metropolitan centers so he could manage, by his own estimation, to make a decent living. Oldham's label, Chicago's Drag City, supports his decision to remain geographically and philosophically in the outlying areas, away from the business of music and closer to the art. Still, Oldham is ambivalent about his distance from the mainstream...
Art
Tuesday, Dec. 16, 2008

Art Review

In "Milwaukee's Own," the Armoury Gallery's last show of 2008, Cassandra Smith and Jessica Steeber bring together four emerging local artists, three of whom created site-specific installations. "Milwaukee's Own" is an academic cross-section of sorts: All four artists are or will be MIAD alumni, trained in Milwaukee in the past decade. Aesthetically, the show is tied together by a minimal palette of paper, polystyrene, graphite, and black and gold paint, and, with the exception of some of Mary DiBiasio's works on paper, by coolly detached...

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