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Monday, July 21, 2008

A&E

Controversial comedian Bill Maher, whose digs can strike the funny bone while hitting a nerve, wants to stimulate critical thinking through the gateway of humor. The fearless if not ruthless cynic, host of HBO’s Emmy-nominated series “Real Time,” will perform at the Riverside Theater on Thursday, July 24.
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Monday, July 21, 2008
Poor Christian Bale never has a chance. As Batman (or “the Batman” as he’s often called in a nod to the earliest comic strips), he is left to brood heavily under his kinky black leather mask. The screen belongs to Ledger’s Joker, even if the streets of Gotham are up for grabs.
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Monday, July 21, 2008
One of two Insurgent Theatre shows to open at the Alchemist Theatre this past weekend, Rex Winsome’s Paint the Town plays out like some grim fairy tale of modern revolution.
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Monday, July 21, 2008
Sadly, it appears that race relations in the United States have changed little since playwright Rebecca Gilman’s controversial drama Spinning Into Butter debuted in Chicago in 1999. Almost a decade after its debut, Pink Banana Theatre Company presents the play at the Tenth Street Theatre on July 17.
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Monday, July 21, 2008
Asublime new exhibit, “Moulthrop Generations: Turned Wood Bowls by Ed, Philip and Matt Moulthrop,” arrives at the Racine Art Museum, the first venue to show the work of three generations of the Moulthrop family in one gallery.
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Monday, July 21, 2008
Starting July 25 at 6 p.m., the walls of Peltz’s vintage Victorian building will be covered what gallery owner Cissie Peltz describes as “feminine splendor.” Peltz hosts its 18th annual “Remarkable Women Show,” which includes more than 35 artists from across nation.
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Monday, July 21, 2008
To fall into the clutches of the Soviet Union’s system of arrest, imprisonment and torture was infamously easy for Americans who entered the nation from the 1930s to the 1950s. To get out was well-nigh impossible—short of death—and little help was to be found from U.
Theater
Wednesday, May 28, 2008

Theater Review

Sunset Playhouse tackles a tough challenge with its latest production, The Boys Next Door. Written in 1985, the play attempts to raise awareness of issues faced by the cognitively disabled. Often, this type of “message” play is long on exposition and short on entertainment. The Sunset production, however, manages to balance both elements quite well. Credit goes to director Mark Salentine for keeping the show on task throughout its two-and-a-half-hour running time.
Theater
Wednesday, March 19, 2008

Theater Reviews

Sometimes the title says it all. Hula Hoop Sha-Boop is a cavalcade of hit tunes from the 1950s, brought to life by a quartet of talented young singers. The fastpaced, 90-minute show zips through more than 70 songs before the final curtain in the Milwaukee Repertory Theater’s Stackner Cabaret.
Theater
Wednesday, March 5, 2008

Theater Reviews

In a sweet and simply told production of Sleeping Beauty, First Stage Children’s Theater offers a treat for the younger set. The script by Charles Way differs substantially from the Disney animated version, but it still tells the basic story of a sleeping princess who must be awakened by love’s first kiss. Consideration for younger children’s sensibilities takes center stage. The evil witch is not too scary; likewise, a large, hairy spider stays sufficiently upstage not to frighten the youngest audience members. Adults will appreciate the many themes that run through the play, including the benefits of a lifetime friendship and the prince’s growing faith in his own abilities.

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