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Classical Music/Dance
Monday, Nov. 23, 2009
Classical Music trivia questions: What do composers Mozart, Caldara, Biber, Salieri and Bruckner have in common? Or: What do composer Franz Schubert and conductors Hans Richter, Felix Mottl and Clemens Krauss share in common? There’s but one direct link...
Classical Music/Dance
Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2009

Classical Preview

Giacomo Puccini (1858-1924) first came across Victorien Sardou’s play La Tosca while it swept Europe’s theaters in the late 1880s, featuring Sarah Bernhardt in the title role. He immediately thought it most apropos for opera. With a larger-than-life villain, distressed heroine and doomed romantic hero, indeed he was right, but...
Off the Cuff
Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2009
For the second year in a row, the Florentine Opera Company welcomes young, talented vocalists to its 2009-2010 Florentine Opera Studio, a full season of artist-in-residence employment for exceptional singers beginning their professional careers. Joining the Florentine this season are soprano Sarah Jones of Columbus, Ohio, mezzo-soprano Julia Hardin...
Classical Music/Dance
Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2009

Classical Preview

There’s long been a certain anxiety among Classical Music’s lovers and practitioners that somehow our music will one day fade into oblivion. Could modern pop culture with its disposable music and ever-shortening attention span spell Classical Music’s doom? But all is truly not lost when we observe...
Classical Music/Dance
Monday, Oct. 12, 2009

Classical Preview

“A composer’s music should express the country of his birth, his love affairs, his religion… I compose because I must give expression to my feelings, just as I talk because I must give utterance to my thoughts.” That succinct statement given in an interview with an American journalist perfectly encapsulates the whole career...
Classical Music/Dance
Monday, Sept. 28, 2009

Classical Preview

Among classical composers, there are many who achieved widespread fame only after their deaths. For the most part toiling in relative obscurity, their works came to be known to a few close friends, perhaps a patron or fellow composer or two during their lifetimes. But among writers...
Classical Music/Dance
Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2009
Early Music Now embraces this season’s theme (Across Borders—Across Time) with an enveloping grasp in its first concert of the season, highlighted by the appearance of New York City-based Galileo’s Daughters. This trio (Sarah Pillow, Mary Anne Ballard and Ronn McFarlane) found inspiration in former New York Times...
Classical Music/Dance
Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2009

Classical Preview

In 1816 when Italian composer Gioacchino Rossini (1792-1868) wrote Il barbiere di Siviglia (The Barber of Seville), he accepted a contract to work for Naples’ theaters, but other cities, too, clamored for his considerable felicity, and it was for a Roman audience that he composed Il barbiere. Though he was but 24 at the time and eventually composed some 32 operas, this work swept the theaters of Europe like few others...
Classical Music/Dance
Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009

Classical Review

For classical music lovers, there's something special about owning a great composer's complete works or particular genre (symphonies, concertos, etc.). In a sense we feel we own a piece of the composer's very being, come closer to his soul, find comfort in knowing that we are not missing any hidden gems. For the legion of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart... 

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