Home / Articles / By Tea Krulos
{imgArticleTop}
Local Music
Tuesday, Dec. 23, 2008

Bilgemunky broadcasts on Internet “arrrr”-waves

"Avast, you scalawags. Bilgemunky Radio is preparing to air…" A robotic female voice with a British accent repeated this a few times shortly before 8 p.m. on a recent Monday night. Meanwhile, Gerard Heidgerken was cueing up to broadcast his weekly Internet pirate radio show. In this case the term "pirate" doesn't refer to a broadcast that taps FCC-sanctioned airwaves, but rather to literal, swashbuckling pirates. Bilgemunky Radio features songs about pirates from mainstream bands and a surprising number of songs from...
Local Music
Monday, Dec. 15, 2008
For the 5 Card Studs, every show is a festival, but the holiday season is a favorite time for the band and their fans. "We have our act, our shtick," lead singer Cesar Palace says. "For some reason with Christmas you can just go that much more over the top with it." The Studs' only two recordings, in fact, are Christmas albums. The Christmas Wishes album features the Studs covering classics like "Blue Christmas" and "Merry Christmas, Baby." North Side of the Pole, a CD EP...
Local Music
Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2008
Jonathan Burks says his songs are mostly about Milwaukee's drinking culture. It's a subject that pervades his material, evoking both good times with your drinking buddies and introspective moments of clarity. On the song "20 Dollar Bill," Burks celebrates taking full advantage of $1 beer specials, while "Brew City Blues" describes Burks' difficulty with staying out of the many bars between his day job and his home. "Drink My Mind" tells of going to the bar to mend a broken heart...
Off the Cuff
Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008
It was 1960 when Jose Ortiz began his career as a “barber extraordinaire.” Besides practicing his brand of “hairapy,” he has also become a politician, teacher, community activist, musician and baseball aficionado. He is the father of musicians Christopher and Nicolaus Ortiz. Christopher...
Local Music
Thursday, Sept. 25, 2008

Milwaukee Noise Fest returns for year three

The Uptowner, a 58-year-old corner bar in Riverwest, seems an unlikely venue for an impromptu noise show on a Saturday night. Peter J. Woods sets up his gear, synthesizers, effect pedals and an electric violin on a card table while a small group of people gather in front of him and a couple of guys shoot pool directly behind him. Then the noise starts.
Concert Reviews
Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2008

Aug. 15, 2008

   Johnny Winter slowly walked onstage, joining his band as they warmed the crowd up. He looked like a Texas blues specter, dressed in black, his cowboy hat shadowing his eyes, his face framed by long, white hair, his arms covered with fade...
Concert Reviews
Tuesday, July 29, 2008

Saturday, July 26, 2008

Shoppers paying the $1.50 entrance fee to 7 Mile Fair were unknowingly paying admission to a concert at an unlikely venue for two local bands, The Trusty Knife and Crappy Dracula. The Trusty Knife has created a local buzz with their unique indie rock, while Crappy Dracula is known for their strange sense of humor and has often been compared to the Dead Milkmen and Flipper. The bands set up under a small makeshift stage in an outdoor stretch between the two main buildings of the fair . . .
Local Music
Thursday, July 17, 2008
Alongside the sounds of copy machines churning out paper and staplers crunching zines together, the first Milwaukee Zine Fest will feature three free music shows with 18 local and touring bands. The majority are punk bands, rounded out by some acoustic, hip-hop and indie rock groups. Zine fest coordinator Jessica Bublitz and Corey Baumann, of local band Louis Tully, organized the shows. “Almost all the bands had an immediate interest,” Bublitz says. “We’re hoping this gives people attending from . . .
Music Feature
Wednesday, July 16, 2008
The band name We’rewolves resulted from a misunderstanding between the group’s members, Eliah Koerner (vocals, keyboard), Dan Perlstein (drums) and Ryan “Smitty” Smith (bass). “I said, ‘Let’s call ourselves The Vampires,’” Perlstein recalled. “And Smitty said, ‘How about werewolves?’ and I thought he said ‘we’rewolves,’ like ‘we are wolves.’” The contraction was subsequently expanded into a song in which the group chants “We are all wolves!” over and over. I interviewed the band before a recent show at Mad Planet. It was raining, and they stood huddled under . . .

Top Articles from Tea Krulos

No articles in this section