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A&E Feature
Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2008

Ecosystems made accessible

Whether it's a line in the sand or the politicized plotting of an expanding empire, maps reveal the predominantly human need to sift through space: to weigh it, name it and own it. This primal urge to locate ourselves within a broader context underlies the "Great Lakes Future" exhibit at Discovery World.
Books
Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2008

Book Preview

Any publisher will tell you that poetry-that music of the soul, that sublime agent of universal values-relies as much on successful marketing and distribution as it does on the inspirational muses if it stands any hope of reaching an attentive ear. For its summer program, ArtWorks for Milwaukee, a local nonprofit organization that provides teens with paid apprenticeships in the arts to teach them critical employment skills, attempted to familiarize students with the personal and pragmatic ends of poetry publishing. Eight high-school students from Milwaukee Public Schools were . . .
Books
Monday, Aug. 18, 2008

Book Preview

For tangible proof of water's life affirming significance one doesn't have to go very far; examining the continual rediscovery and reinvention of Milwaukee's rivers will suffice. Whether it's early settlers drawn to the rivers' abundance of wild rice and waterfowl, fur traders looking for profitable inroads into Wisconsin's luxuriant wilderness, feuding founders using the rivers as battlegrounds or city officials seeking to transform them . . .
Books
Wednesday, July 30, 2008

Book Preview

When the Japanese army invaded Burma during World War II, 10-year-old Prem Sharma and his family were among the thousands of refugees who fled to safety in India. Not long afterwards they found themselves embroiled in another bloody conflict: the violent partition of Pakistan and India and the latter’s hard-won independence from century-long colonial rule.
A&E Feature
Wednesday, July 30, 2008

The ‘people’ behind People’s Books Cooperative

There’s no denying it: We live in a world ruled by huge multinational corporations increasingly estranged from their places of origin. Perhaps the best any of us can hope for is that they outpace even themselves and eventually run out of steam. Luckily, Milwaukee is home to a growing number of enterprises taking a more active stance, seeking egalitarian alternatives to the corporate model in a bid to give community building more important role than investment seeking. Among them is People’s Books Cooperative, an independent bookstore that marks its first anniversary as a cooperative enterprise on Sept. 1 . . .
Books
Wednesday, July 23, 2008

Designing for the urban age

Cities are like organized religion: richly layered, often paradoxical and uniquely qualified to bring out the best and worst in humankind. A new book edited by Ricky Burdett and Deyan Sudjic, titled The Endless City (Phaidon), conveys the oft-contradictory nature of cities, including their innate ability to both quell and incite social and political conflict. At least, that’s the salutary subtext of the book. Its more arrant objective is to lend fire-and-brimstone urgency to the sharp rise in the world’s urban population within the past century. Even the book’s blazing orange cover, inscribed with eye-popping statistics (75% of the world’s population will live in cities by 2050!) is used to convey the apocalyptic immediacy of its appeal . . .
Books
Wednesday, July 23, 2008

Book Preview

The stage is almost set for the world’s greatest sporting event, the Olympic Games. As China fends off attacks against its human rights record while battling the unsightly algae on its beaches, it might be heartened by the thought that a Pulitzer prize-winning author could one day invest the 2008 Beijing Olympics . . .
Art
Wednesday, July 23, 2008

Art Review

Every now and then an artist sparks controversy through no design of his own. It’s a scenario especially endemic to public art, and one with which Milwaukee is uncomfortably familiar. The city is rife with examples of public art that have provoked impassioned outcries from one party or another, whether they’re proposed projects that never got off the ground or ones single-mindedly propelled forward by a will unmatched by that of their most ardent foes. Each occasion yields the potential for an enriching discussion on the significance of public art. Whether or not it has been sufficiently taken up is another matter . . .
Theater
Tuesday, July 15, 2008

Theater Review

On Friday night Acacia Theatre opened its production of Pride and Prejudice at Concordia University’s Todd Wehr Auditorium. Judging by the audience’s enthusiastic exclamations they were unreservedly appreciative of any opportunity to watch Jane Austen’s romantic comedy unfold. Had they been a more punishing group of dyed-in-the-wool Austen fanatics they would undoubtedly have found some fault in this production, adapted for the stage by Jon Jory and directed by Bradley Winkler. One would be that the novel has been considerably abridged to fit into its two and a half hour running time. It’s an understandable measure, but one that at times results in a curious asymmetry. While certain scenes, like the dance . . .
Books
Tuesday, July 15, 2008

Book Preview

As Russia shakes off the torpor of the ’90s and resumes its place as an economic power, a new thriller by Brent Ghelfi returns readers to the seedy underbelly of post-Soviet society. In Volk’s Shadow—a sequel to Ghelfi’s 2007 book Volk’s Game—the grim, battle-hardened anti-hero of the first story returns, this time in search of a Faberg egg that turns out to be a red herring in a deeper plot concerning atrocities carried . . .

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