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Books
Friday, Feb. 22, 2008

Book Preview

Since publishing his first novel, The Death of Vishnu, Manil Suri has joined the pantheon of Indian writers gaining widespread recognition for their English prose. The first of his books to use the Hindu trinity to explore the present-day realities of India, it was intended as part of a trilogy, albeit one that departs from the traditional format of continuous plot and characters. “It’s rather like three panels of a triptych in the sense that there are these three faces of the Hindu trinity, Vishnu, Shiva and Brahma, and I was trying to distill the essence of each,” Suri says.
Authors' Voices (Online Exclusive)
Friday, Feb. 22, 2008

Interview with Manil Suri

In his first novel, The Death of Vishnu, Manil Suri used Hindu mythology and the tinsely allure of the Bollywood film industry to explore the lives of characters inhabiting a Mumbai apartment building. His second novel, The Age of Shiva, continues the tradition, affirming his talent for creating well-drawn characters and sensitive prose.
Theater
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2008

Theater Reviews

Milwaukee Chamber Theatre’s production of Crime and Punishment invites audiences to enter the mind of a murderer. It’s a cramped and tawdry place. Oddly angled walls painted a bilious green seem to close in on you; disembodied sounds emanate from the background and doors swoosh open and shut, marking phantomlike entrances and offering glimpses of a diaphanous limbo in which the protagonist’s fearsome existence appears to be couched. Rarely does stagecraft, sound and lighting play such a significant role as it does here in this pareddown production.
Books
Thursday, Feb. 14, 2008

Book Preview

Anyone who has children is aware of the number of resources available to new and prospective parents. But how much of those are geared toward the progressive punk parent? When activist/musician/teacher Jessica Mills became pregnant, she was struck by the lack of mainstream parenting literature that spoke to her own subculture where, as she puts it, “politics intersects with parenting,” so she decided to write one of her own.
Art
Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2008

Art Review

An exhibition of etchings by William Hogarth at the Haggerty Museum (through April 13) shows an artist proudly exerting the ideals of English liberty by deftly holding his society up to scorn. Despite the didactic tone of much of the work in this exhibit, it’s clear the artist held no human virtue to be entirely incorruptible.
Books
Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2008

Book Preview

With summer still months away, mentally transporting yourself to warmer climes isn’t a bad idea. On Feb. 12, the Friends of the UWM Golda Meir Library hosts a talk and book-signing by author Paul Salsini, followed by a demonstration of Tuscan cooking by chef-instructors Elissa Frank and Simonetta Palazio . . .
Art
Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2008

Art Review

No wonder paranoids flourish,” says Nicholas Frank in his curatorial statement for “The Flight of Fake Tears,” a new exhibit at Inova/Kenilworth Gallery. He describes the void, the blank page, the unaccountable matter ingrained in our very existence, as the seat of a primal anxiety. Whether its through a tantalizing . . .
Off the Cuff
Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2008
Interviewing the director of any organization, arts or otherwise, often requires a good deal of mental fortitude—not least because of the selfmarketing minutiae one has to endure. Not so with David Gordon.
Theater
Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2008

Theater Review

This past weekend, Milwaukee Shakespeare’s production of Twelfth Night transported audiences to a modern-day Illyria that resembled an upscale coastal resort.

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