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Authors' Voices (Online Exclusive)
Monday, March 24, 2008

Interview with Tod Wodicka

The munificent title of Tod Wodicka’s debut novel, All Shall Be Well and All Shall Be Well, and All manner of Things Shall Be Well hints at the desperate optimism of it’s wretched protagonist: Burt Hecker, a mead-swilling, tunic-sporting 20th century idler stuck in a medieval past. From his home in Berlin, Germany, Wodicka talks about his new book.
Books
Wednesday, March 19, 2008

Book Preview

When Marie Antoinette was reputed (however erroneously) to have waived off the plight of France’s starving masses with the words “Let them eat cake” she was clearly unaware of the dire repercussions. The same might be said of the characters in Joanne Fluke’s best-selling Hannah Swensen mysteries. Dead bodies keep turning up in a small Minnesotan town, bearing evidence of having indulged in Swensen’s sweet delights prior to their demise.
A&E Feature
Wednesday, March 19, 2008

The problem with multi-task buildings

A fever is spreading across the nation. It’s called the condo-hotel (Condotel as it’s affectionately known by real-estate experts) and it’s soon to take Milwaukee’s Park East by storm. Not one but five condohotel-retail developments are slated for the area, the first of which, Staybridge Suites, will be completed later this year. The ecstatic approval such developments excite has much to do with their economic viability. Another is the widely held notion that diversity of uses inside a building will contribute to the diversity and vitality in the spaces outside of the building . . .
Books
Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Book Preview

Moe Prager is no stranger to cold cases. You might even say the former NYPD officer and protagonist of Reed Farrel Coleman’s award-winning P.I. series relishes the challenges they pose. He lives by Faulkner’s words, “The past is never dead,” the truth of which becomes unequivocally clear in Coleman’s fifth novel of the series, Empty Ever After.
Books
Wednesday, March 5, 2008

Book Preview

School shootings, date rape, kidnapping, modern-day witch hunts for alleged sexual predators: These are just a few of the thorny issues Jodi Picoult has dealt with in the numerous novels she’s written to date. And in each of them she offers readers a vantage point from which hasty moral judgments are impossible. In her new book, Change of Heart, she tackles capital punishment, using it as a vehicle to examine religious dogma and the crippling loss of a loved one, as well as the fallacy of sentencing a man to death without fully understanding his crime.
Authors' Voices (Online Exclusive)
Tuesday, March 4, 2008

Interview with Jodie Picoult

No stranger to difficult moral issues that society likes to avoid discussing, Jodi Picoult’s new book, Change of Heart, deals with capital punishment, religious dogma, the crippling loss of a loved one and the fact people can surprise you in ways you’d least expect. She talks to us about this, her 15th novel to date.
Authors' Voices (Online Exclusive)
Thursday, Feb. 28, 2008

Interview with Susan Vreeland

Susan Vreeland, New York Times best-selling author of Girl in Hyacinth Blue, has recently published a new novel inspired by an artistic masterpiece: Renoir’s Luncheon of the Boating Party. Using the painting’s subjects and creator as a starting point she offers a vivid portrait of French society in the late-19th century.
Books
Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008

Book Preview

Poetry or fiction that extols the virtues of art is certainly not a new phenomenon. Think of Keats’ “Ode on a Grecian Urn.” In recent years authors like Tracy Chevalier and Jeanne Kalogridis have come to prominence for constructing fictional narratives around specific works of art, using them as a starting point from which to explore the social or historical context within which they were painted. Perhaps more importantly, they allow readers to peek beneath the shroud of mystery surrounding artists and their subjects. Susan Vreeland’s new novel, Luncheon of the Boating Party, belongs to this vein of fiction. Based on Renoir’s painting of the same name, it allows readers to enter the painting’s leisurely scene and capture a view of Parisian society in the late 19th century.
Art
Saturday, Feb. 23, 2008

Art Review

When Marcel Duchamp signed a urinal and submitted it to an exhibit in 1917, it was more than just a brazen gesture. It sounded the knell of art as it was previously known. After bringing it down to the lowest common denominator, what else remained?

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