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Cover Story
Wednesday, May 28, 2008

Courting the Cool Factor

Some of the most prestigious awards in architecture were handed out earlier this year. But while the initial flurry of excitement greeting the annual American Institute of Architects awards or the much coveted Pritzker Prize has subsided, one set of accolades still remains for Milwaukee’s design:
Books
Tuesday, May 27, 2008

Book Preview

Racial tensions between the white and Hmong communities came to light in Wisconsin’s 2004 hunting season. And the recent discussions surrounding the hunting of wolves, which were removed from the federal endangered species list just this year, have sharpened conflicts between those who feel hunting is an . . .
Books
Tuesday, May 20, 2008

Book Preview

For some, the adage “home is where the heart is” is a hackneyed platitude; for others, it’s a wrenching expression of an almost filial bond. In Milwaukee native Sandy Tolan’s 2006 nonfiction book, The Lemon Tree: An Arab, A Jew and the Heart of the Middle East, a Palestinian returning to his ancestral home in Ramla uses such visceral terms to describe his connection to the land from which he was expelled 20 years earlier.
Art
Tuesday, May 20, 2008

Art Review

In some respects, Santiago Cucullu’s on-site installation at the Milwaukee Art Museum encapsulates the postmodern spirit. Rather than being a single cohesive piece, it’s an agglomeration of micro-narratives. Titled MF Ziggurat, an allusion to the centrality and untouchable sacredness of those imposing Mesopotamian and Central American structures, the piece seeks to transgress the inviolable quality of our modern-day ziggurats—soaring skyscrapers and elegant art museums in whose deep shadows the city churns in habitual ferment.
Theater
Tuesday, May 13, 2008

Theater Review

Pain and suffering, when they transcend the vague forms of conjecture and materialize into a cold, hard fact, can shake the firmest of faiths. When Michael Chobanoff, who plays C. S. Lewis in Acacia Theatre’s production of Shadowlands, stands before the audience and declares self-sufficiency is the enemy of salvation, even those unfamiliar with his life will have an inkling his complacency will be severely tested. And so it is.
Books
Tuesday, May 13, 2008

Book Preview

In June 1998, a Time Magazine article tried to convince readers that feminism was dead. After withstanding decades of being misrepresented by the media (and possibly misrepresented by itself), the boisterous lyrics of the Spice Girls and Ally McBeal’s persistently nonplussed visage had simply proven too much for it. Feminism had finally come to a most undignified demise. Or had it?
A&E Feature
Tuesday, May 13, 2008

Wisconsin’s architectural record

Nestled within the splendid interior of Milwaukee’s Central Library is one of the city’s well-kept secrets, the Wisconsin Architectural Archive. Established around the same time that some of the city’s architectural assets were razed to make way for freeways, it’s become a haven where the state’s architectural wealth can be safeguarded from the wrecking ball of fate or changing fashion. In the early-’70s, says Gabi Eschweiler, her husband, Tom, grandson of the celebrated Milwaukee architect Alexander Eschweiler, was made an offer he couldn’t refuse.
News Features
Wednesday, May 7, 2008

Paradise in Our Own Back Yard

A viewshed is an area visible to an observer from a certain vantage point. It usually includes elements of natural interest and precludes unwanted visual incursions like tall buildings. When the Milwaukee River Work Group (MRWG) talks about preserving...
News Features
Wednesday, May 7, 2008

Paradise in Our Own Back Yard

The fact that most of the river’s green corridor is surrounded by public parkland makes it easier for the MRWG to fulfill its vision. However, among the privately owned portions of the river, there’s at least one significant site that’s been the source of some dissent.

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