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Books
Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013

New books on the meaning of America

 An Oxford scholar with a hilarious sense of humor, Terry Eagleton is self-deprecating while alert to the preposterous mores and habits of mind around him. In Across the Pond, he turns his wit to the vexed question of the U.S. and the U.K., two nations famously divided by one language.
Film
Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013
 The timing for Closed Circuit’s release couldn’t be better. With Edward Snowden in Russia, the conviction of the U.S. Army’s Wikileaker, vigorous public debate over the NSA’s surveillance program, the Boston Marathon massacre and the British secret service aggressively trying to stop the
Dining Out
Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013

O’Donoghue’s brings a touch of Ireland to the suburbs

 Elm Grove is thought of as a bird sanctuary, a bedroom suburb and home to one of the area’s longest-running community theaters, the Sunset Playhouse. The idea of a little colony of Ireland
Books
Sunday, Aug. 25, 2013
 Lighthouses dot the Wisconsin shore, many of them dating from the age of sailing ships. The advent of GPS rendered them less vital, yet the
Home Movies/Out on Digital
Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013
 What’s more degrading: the objectification of beauty pageants or confinement to the housewife role? The question confronts the women of this documentary, split between Miss India contestant classes and a Hindu nationalist girls camp. The beauty queens gain self-confidence (narcissism?)
Film
Monday, Aug. 19, 2013

The future is unwritten as teens come of age

 After a long night of partying, climaxed by an ineffectual stab at telling off the girl who had recently left him, Sutter (Miles Teller) awakens in the morning on a stranger’s lawn. The girl who discovers
Books
Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2013
 Written in the clean, hard prose of a classic screenplay or a Raymond Chandler story, The Supper Club Book (Chicago Review Press) is the second publication of its kind this year. Its author, the Chicago Sun-Times’ Dave Hoekstra, traveled more widely than Ron Faiola, who penned the recent