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Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Where Art and Industry Meet (and Get Along Famously!)

Collaboration at the John Michael Kohler Art Center

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“Arts/Industry: Collaboration and Revelation” celebrates the 40th anniversary of the John Michael Kohler Art Center’s Arts/Industry residency program. Each year, the program permits up to 22 artists to work up to six months in the Kohler Co. factory to produce original works of art. Given their birthplace, the works flirt with the boundary between the industrial and the aesthetic. The snaking lines of plumbing and mass production, for example, are reoccurring themes in the show.

The exhibition is a retrospective of highlights from four decades of Arts/Industry. But unlike most midlife crises, this 40 year old is reflective about its past instead of anxious about its future. More than 350 works from the pottery, foundry and enamel shop will demonstrate the successful intermingling of the putatively exclusive realms of arts and industry.

The opening celebration takes place on Saturday, March 22, from 6-9 p.m. with live music from purgAtory hill, hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar. Artist talks begin at 7 p.m. Admission is free for members or $9 for the general public.

 

“Triangulation: Locating Creative Perspectives at Three Milwaukee High Schools”

Cardinal Stritch University, Northwestern Mutual Gallery

6801 N. Yates Road

Is there a correlation between age and creative capabilities? John Keats was no more at 25. Thomas Chatterton drank arsenic at 17. Those who shuffled off their mortal coil at 27 are too numerous to list. To be sure, counterexamples abound, but undoubtedly the vim and vigor of youth begets spirited works. “Triangulation” exhibits the art of great precocity from Ronald Reagan High School, Shorewood High School and Homestead High School. The show opens at Cardinal Stritch University on March 21 and closes April 20.

 

“Self Portraits”

Gallery 224

224 E. Main St., Port Washington

It could be reasonably argued that all art is a self-portrait of sorts. Insofar as it discloses the inner workings of its creator, art cannot but portray his or her irreducible individuality. “Self Portraits” at Port Washington’s Gallery 224 exhibits the likenesses of individuals ranging from ages 3 to 93, painting in broad strokes the development of human beings in self-perception and self-conception. If you attend the opening reception on Friday, March 21, from 5-7 p.m., you’ll have the opportunity to see the displayed faces in the flesh since the artists will be introduced. “Self Portraits” is on display until April 12.