Home / Concert Reviews / The Avett Brothers w/ The Low Anthem @ The Riverside Theater
Wednesday, March 10, 2010

The Avett Brothers w/ The Low Anthem @ The Riverside Theater

March 6, 2010

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Capitalizing on the golden opportunity of their Milwaukee appearance being up-sized from Turner Hall Ballroom to the Riverside Theater, The Avett Brothers and The Low Anthem played with a purpose on Saturday night as admiring concertgoers let loose in celebration.

Even before headliners The Avett Brothers took the stage, the crowd’s roar grew louder by the minute as a screen with a yellow-and-blue teardrops background was lowered behind the stage (this screen later was replaced by one of the Brooklyn Bridge).

The Avetts didn’t waste any time in showcasing their veteran blend of Americana, folk, country and rock ’n’ roll music, showing no signs of tour wear as they began the night with an all-out, energetic rendition of “Head Full of Doubt.”

At times brothers Seth and Scott Avett began jumping around the stage with guitar and banjo, respectively, while Joe Kwon swung his cello around in excitement as the band hit their stride.

Never a dull moment, The Avett Brothers offered a set list full of songs from their acclaimed Rick Rubin collaboration I and Love and You—including “Slight Figure of Speech” and “And It Spread”—and favorites from their extensive catalog. The band lent a punk-like feel to their faster-paced songs by giving the tunes an added punch of energy.

Even the ballads had the audience transfixed and cheering.

Throughout their performance, a fury of cheers, sing-alongs and dancing in the aisles grew like wildfire. The lovely, sold-out crowd let their appreciation for the band be known.

The band ended the night with a commanding rendition of “I and Love and You,” complete with fans gesturing the three words with their hands, as if to say what they felt about the group.

Openers The Low Anthem played in support of their recent album Oh My God, Charlie Darwin, and relished the opportunity for greater exposure that the show provided.

While The Low Anthem didn’t quite have the same stage presence as the Avetts, they made up for it by presenting a quality, hour-long set of folk-rock and Americana songs.